Harvey Family Tree 2018-04-30

Alfred Benjamin WaldronAge: 85 years18251910

Name
Alfred Benjamin Waldron
Given names
Alfred Benjamin
Surname
Waldron
Birth February 1825 21 35
Christening February 27, 1825
Birth of a sisterEmma Waldron
January 1827 (Age 23 months)
Residence
Type: Bogong Gold fields (Woodshed Valley Beechworth area

Christening of a sisterEmma Waldron
January 7, 1827 (Age 23 months)
Birth of a sisterMercy Waldron
December 1830 (Age 5 years)
Christening of a sisterMercy Waldron
December 26, 1830 (Age 5 years)
Death of a fatherJames Waldron
September 1837 (Age 12 years)
Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N52.456479 Longitude: W2.147098

MarriageSarah GardenerView this family
September 15, 1845 (Age 20 years)
Old Swinford, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N52.450413 Longitude: W2.140091

Birth of a daughter
#1
Sarah Waldron
1845 (Age 19 years)
Birth of a daughter
#2
Mercy Waldron
1847 (Age 21 years)
Christening of a daughterMercy Waldron
1847 (Age 21 years)
Death of a motherElizabeth Hazeldine
September 1849 (Age 24 years)
Birth of a daughter
#3
Emma Waldron
November 11, 1849 (Age 24 years)
Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N52.456479 Longitude: W2.147098

Christening of a daughterEmma Waldron
1849 (Age 23 years)
Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N52.456479 Longitude: W2.147098

Birth of a son
#4
Alfred Waldron
October 23, 1853 (Age 28 years)
Christening of a sonAlfred Waldron
October 1853 (Age 28 years)
Emigration
Type: Arrived Port Philip, Victoria, Australia
December 12, 1854 (Age 29 years)
Birth of a son
#5
William Waldron
1855 (Age 29 years)
Occupation
trading and dealing in horses
from 1854 to 1856 (Age 28 years)
Emerald Hill, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S37.835 Longitude: E144.96

Birth of a son
#6
Joseph Waldron
1857 (Age 31 years)
Beechworth, Buninyong, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.353302 Longitude: E146.687725

Birth of a son
#7
Henry Gardener Waldron
1859 (Age 33 years)
Birth of a son
#8
Edward Benjamin Waldron
1860 (Age 34 years)
Indigo, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.230676 Longitude: E146.696286

Occupation
Gold Prospector
from 1856 to 1861 (Age 30 years)
Birth of a son
#9
Thomas Waldron
1862 (Age 36 years)
Birth of a son
#10
John Waldron
March 26, 1864 (Age 39 years)
Address: Wangaratta Road
Marriage of a childFrancis RichardsSarah WaldronView this family
1864 (Age 38 years)
Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.15 Longitude: E146.6

Death of a sonWilliam Waldron
1864 (Age 38 years)
Address: Wangaratta Road
Death of a sonThomas Waldron
1864 (Age 38 years)
Address: Wangaratta Road
Death of a sonJohn Waldron
March 26, 1864 (Age 39 years)
Address: Wangaratta Road
Death of a wifeSarah Gardener
March 27, 1864 (Age 39 years)
Address: Wangaratta Road
Burial of a wifeSarah Gardener
March 28, 1864 (Age 39 years)
MarriageMary McIntyreView this family
October 30, 1864 (Age 39 years)
Occupation
operating a dairy selling milk to the miners
from 1860 to 1864 (Age 34 years)
Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.15 Longitude: E146.6

Occupation
Pub (own & operate)
from 1861 to 1864 (Age 35 years)
Address: Wangaratta Road
Burial of a sonWilliam Waldron
1864 (Age 38 years)
Burial of a sonThomas Waldron
1864 (Age 38 years)
Burial of a sonJohn Waldron
March 1864 (Age 39 years)
Occupation
Farmer
1864 (Age 38 years)
Birth of a son
#11
Lachlan McIntyre Waldron
December 27, 1865 (Age 40 years)
Boorhaman, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.23 Longitude: E146.304

Death of a sonLachlan McIntyre Waldron
March 4, 1867 (Age 42 years)
Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.15 Longitude: E146.6

Burial of a sonLachlan McIntyre Waldron
March 6, 1867 (Age 42 years)
Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.15 Longitude: E146.6

Birth of a son
#12
David Daniel Waldron
March 27, 1867 (Age 42 years)
Boorhaman, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.23 Longitude: E146.304

Marriage of a childFredrick Francis WoodwardMercy WaldronView this family
1868 (Age 42 years)
Birth of a daughter
#13
Helen McBeth Waldron
February 8, 1869 (Age 44 years)
Marriage of a childJonathan HarveyEmma WaldronView this family
May 3, 1869 (Age 44 years)
Beechworth, Indigo, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.353302 Longitude: E146.687725

Occupation
The Perseverance Steam Saw Mill (owned & operated)
April 15, 1870 (Age 45 years)
Birth of a daughter
#14
Elizabeth Waldron
November 24, 1870 (Age 45 years)
Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.15 Longitude: E146.6

Birth of a son
#15
Albert Waldron
1872 (Age 46 years)
Indigo, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.230676 Longitude: E146.696286

Birth of a son
#16
Albert Waldron
August 29, 1872 (Age 47 years)
Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.15 Longitude: E146.6

Birth of a son
#17
Hugh McIntyre Waldron
1874 (Age 48 years)
Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.15 Longitude: E146.6

Birth of a son
#18
Hugh McIntyre Waldron
August 30, 1874 (Age 49 years)
Black Dog Creek, Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.180285 Longitude: E146.673725

Birth of a son
#19
Archibald McIntyre Waldron
November 4, 1876 (Age 51 years)
Birth of a son
#20
Archibald McIntyre Waldron
1877 (Age 51 years)
Marriage of a childHenry Gardener WaldronMary Ann BoagView this family
1886 (Age 60 years)
Roma, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.569448 Longitude: E148.783762

Marriage of a childJoseph WaldronAgnas WardView this family
1887 (Age 61 years)
Roma, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.569448 Longitude: E148.783762

Marriage of a childRobert TaylorHelen McBeth WaldronView this family
June 12, 1895 (Age 70 years)
Roma, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.569448 Longitude: E148.783762

Death of a daughterHelen McBeth Waldron
August 1, 1897 (Age 72 years)
Burial of a daughterHelen McBeth Waldron
August 2, 1898 (Age 73 years)
Roma Cemetery, Roma, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.580365 Longitude: E148.796393

Death of a daughterSarah Waldron
1900 (Age 74 years)
Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.876335 Longitude: E143.851315

Burial of a daughterSarah Waldron
1900 (Age 74 years)
Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.876335 Longitude: E143.851315

Occupation
Farmer
1903 (Age 77 years)
Address: Northern Road
Death of a wifeMary McIntyre
September 25, 1907 (Age 82 years)
Roma, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.569448 Longitude: E148.783762

Burial of a wifeMary McIntyre
September 26, 1907 (Age 82 years)
Roma, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.569448 Longitude: E148.783762

Death of a daughterMercy Waldron
1908 (Age 82 years)
Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.15 Longitude: E146.6

Burial of a daughterMercy Waldron
1908 (Age 82 years)
Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.15 Longitude: E146.6

Christening of a daughterSarah Waldron
Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N52.456479 Longitude: W2.147098

Death September 27, 1910 (Age 85 years)
Roma, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.569448 Longitude: E148.783762

Burial September 28, 1910 (1 day after death)
Roma Cemetery, Roma, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.580365 Longitude: E148.796393

Family with parents - View this family
father
James Waldron
Birth: April 17, 1803 26 25Brierley Hill, Staffordshire, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 1837Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
mother
Elizabeth Hazeldine
Birth: January 6, 1790 30 30Newport, Shropshire, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 1849Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Marriage: February 29, 1824Parish Church, Kingswinford, Staffordshire, England, United Kingdom
1 year
himself
2 years
younger sister
4 years
younger sister
Mercy Waldron
Birth: December 1830 27 40Old Swinford, Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Family with Sarah Gardener - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: September 15, 1845Old Swinford, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
4 months
daughter
3 years
daughter
3 years
daughter
4 years
son
Alfred Waldron jun.jpgAlfred Waldron
Birth: October 23, 1853 28 27Old Swinford, Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Death: 1915Wallumbilla, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
2 years
son
William Waldron
Birth: 1855 29 28Emerald Hills, South Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Death: 1864Turf Hotel, Wangaratta Road, Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
3 years
son
Joseph Waldron
Birth: 1857 31 30Beechworth, Buninyong, Victoria, Australia
Death: May 16, 1928Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
3 years
son
2 years
son
3 years
son
Thomas Waldron
Birth: 1862 36 35Emerald Hills, South Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Death: 1864Turf Hotel, Wangaratta Road, Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
2 years
son
John Waldron
Birth: March 26, 1864 39 38Turf Hotel, Wangaratta Road, Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Death: March 26, 1864Turf Hotel, Wangaratta Road, Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Family with Mary McIntyre - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: October 30, 1864Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
4 years
daughter
Helen McBeth Waldron
Birth: February 8, 1869 44 33Booralmin, Victoria, Australia
Death: August 1, 1897Bungil Bridge, Roma, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
4 years
son
3 years
son
4 years
son
-11 years
son
Lachlan McIntyre Waldron
Birth: December 27, 1865 40 29Boorhaman, Victoria, Australia
Death: March 4, 1867Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
15 months
son
David Daniel Waldron
Birth: March 27, 1867 42 31Boorhaman, Victoria, Australia
Death: September 3, 1947Roma, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
4 years
daughter
21 months
son
2 years
son
Hugh McIntyre Waldron
Birth: August 30, 1874 49 38Black Dog Creek, Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Death: September 29, 1942Teneriffe, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
2 years
son
Archibald McIntyre Waldron
Birth: November 4, 1876 51 40Canters Gully, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia
Death: about 1955Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Marriage

Originally, it was an extensive ancient parish, covering the whole of the former Municipal Borough of Stourbridge, except Pedmore. This included Wollaston, Lye, and Norton (which were part of the same manor), but Stourbridge and Amblecote, while in the parish, were separate manors.

Amblecote was formerly in Staffordshire, but the rest of the parish (south of the River Stour) was in Worcestershire. Both Stourbridge and Amblecote were formerly administered separately from the rest of Oldswinford. The Parish Church of Oldswinford is St Mary's Church.

The manor of Old Swinford changed hands from time to time during the Middle Ages as a result of political upheavals and the changes of fortune of its overlords. It is questionable whether these great feudal lords ever visited this manor, the supervision of the peasants' customary service and the collection of dues and fines being left to their stewards. The Lytteltons, seated a few miles away at Frankley until their house there was destroyed during the Civil War causing them to move to Hagley, acquired the superior manor of Old Swinford in 1564 and they were the dominant local family until the 17th century when, having fallen from favour and lost much of their wealth through involvement in the Gunpowder Plot and the Royalist and Roman Catholic causes in Stuart times, they were superseded by the Foleys whose wealth was based on the rapidly expanding iron industry.

The name was sometimes formerly written Old Swinford. This spelling is still used for Old Swinford Hospital, a voluntary-aided school with boarding houses, founded and endowed by the ironmaster, Thomas Foley. The parish name and that of Kingswinford derive from a swine ford, perhaps on the crossing of the Stour that also gave rise to the name Stourbridge. The road crossing there was the main road between the Saxon burhs of Worcester and Stafford.[1] However (conceivably), it was a crossing of the minor brook that runs east of the church and under Brook Road between the houses 2 (The Briars) and 4 (The Willows), Oldswinford.

There are numerous pre-1900 buildings remaining in Oldswinford. The area has also been heavily developed with upmarket private housing since the 1920s.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oldswinford

Occupation

Alfred Benjamin Waldren & Family Letter by George Truscott * RHSV, COPY,MS 000054

Queensland Electoral Roll 1903, Occupation Farmer, (with second wife Mary) Northern Road, Roma, Queensland Arrived Port Philip with family on the maiden voyage of the Sultana,1316 ton, of White Star Line, DC Taylor, Liverpool 13 Sep 1854 Port Philip 12 Dec 1854. Letter by George Truscott * RHSV, COPY,MS 000054 / with 381 migrants. Emma's father, Alfred Waldron, had come to Australia on the sailing ship 'Sultana in 1854 on its maiden voyage, paying the fare for himself and his young family. Alfred first settled at Emerald Hill (now called South Melbourne) trading and dealing in horses. Alfred was reputed to have dealt in horses during his first stay in Melbourne and the day before he left for the goldfields he bought horses for 100 pounds and resold them the same day for 150 pounds. Unfortunately, not all his deals were successful. He missed the deal of a lifetime. He was offered a parcel of 10 acres of land at 1 pound an acre, the top price in those days. Unfortunately he declined the offer as it was very densely timbered and he thought the cost of clearing would be too great. This land is now situated in the heart of the city of Melbourne.

1856 finds Alfred Waldron and his family were in the Bogong Gold fields (Woodshed Valley Beechworth area), then onto the Indigo gold fields, nearer the Murray River. Alfred had mixed fortunes and about 1858 decided to return to Melbourne believing he could make more money in his old profession as a dealer in horses.

At the end of 1860 Alfred Waldron is at Chiltern where he was operating a dairy selling milk to the miners this being more profitable than scratching for gold although he still held shares in deep mining at Chiltern. In 1861 he obtained a license to operate a hotel on the Wangaratta Road, near the racetrack just outside Chiltern - hence the name the 'Turf Hotel'. This he operated successfully in conjunction with his dairying until 1864, when he lost his wife Sarah (Gardener)and three of his sons all in the same year. Alfred married Mary McIntyre and later farmed' at Escort, Victoria (near Chiltern), still having some interests at Chiltern, eventually moving back to that town . The Eight Annual Show atChiltern, Barnawaratha, and Indigo, Horticultural and Agriculture Society which was held in February 1871. The History of Chiltern says the show was a great success and indicates an effort of settlement and farming. Great interest was showing cattle by the Judges Jason Withers, John O'Neill and Alfred Waldron. CHILTERN FRIDAY APRIL 15 1870 The Perseverance Steam Saw Mill Near the Chiltern Pound A. WALDRON Has to announce to the public that he has erected the above Stem Saw Mill and is now able to supply, in any quantity, And at the most moderate prices

ALL KINDS OF TIMBER Including the best Murray pine

Chiltern Friday April 15 1870

NEW INSOLVENT Alfred Waldron Chiltern, formerly farmer Now sawyer. Causes of insolvency - Losses in business and in hiring a threshing Machine. Liabilities, seven hundred and fifty Two pounds, assets, eighty eight pounds six Shillings, deficiency six hundred and sixty Four pounds nine shillings. Mr John Turner Official Assignee.

Saturday 1st February 1879

FURNITURE FURNITURE Alex McLeery Has received instructions from Mr A Waldron To sell by public auction, on the above date, At the Chiltern Valley Hotel, the whole of his Household.

FURNITURE And effects, comprising billiard table, bagatelle Table, chairs sofas tables, bedsteads, palliasses, Pictures tumblers, meat safes, clocks, kitchen utensils And three large water tanks. Also three milch cows With calves at foot. Lot of four and five year old Bullocks, six well bred pigs (large size), Half ton cheese, Fowls etc. Also saddle and draught horses, dray harness, Saddles and bridles also sundries. The Auctioneer desires to draw special attention to the Above sale, as all goods names are in first class Condition and nearly new. Sale at 12 o”clock

In1879, Alfred sold up his Victorian interests and travelled overland to Queensland

Alfred's christening details have not been found. On his death certificate, it records his place of birth as Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England. Stourbridge was a small hamlet next to the village of Old Swinford. On the marriage certificate to Sarah Gardner, Alfred's father is recorded as James Waldron.

It was reported that Alfred travelled throughout England and Wales, attending various horse fairs as a horse dealer. It was a risky business in those days as money for transactions had to be carried in cash, usually gold. On one occasion Alfred had a narrow escape when he sold a large number of horses and was carrying considerable amount of cash. There was only one inn situated in the village which the fair was held, but the hour was late and he was forced by circumstances to avail himself of the accommodation there. It looked by no means impressive and the innkeeper was, to put it mildly, the type to immediately arouse one's suspicions and added to this there were no locks on the door. It was the custom in those days for horse dealers to carry horse pistols. These were about a foot long and were loaded on the same principal as a muzzle loader gun. Alfred on this occasion was unarmed, but his impression of the innkeeper warned him to take the precaution of barricading the door with all the furniture of the room. About the hour of midnight, he heard someone try the door. He immediately challenged the intending intruder, but getting no answer, threatened to shoot should he try to enter. There was a candle stick in the room and he used the old fashioned candle ejector with which to make a noise similar to the cocking of a pistol. It can hardly be said that he spent a comfortable night and he felt even less comfortable soon afterwards when this particular inn was burnt down and several human skeletons were found in the cellar.

Alfred was married twice and had children from both marriages. His first wife was Sarah GARDNER and they had 10 children: Sarah (b. Abet 1846), Mercy (b. Abet 1848), Emma (b. Abet 1850), Alfred (b Abet 1852), William (dead before 1865) Joseph(b . Abet 1857), Henry (b. Abet 1859), Edward (b Abet 1861), Thomas (dead before 1865), John ?. Sarah and Alfred were married in England. Alfred was then 19 years of age.

Alfred, Sarah Gardner (his wife), and their children Sarah, Mercy, Emma and Alfred arrived in Sydney as unassisted migrants in December 1854 on the ship 'Sultana'. During the long voyage, Emma (my grandmother) nearly died and the family were prepared to bury her at sea, however she survived and had a long and fruitful life. The records of the 'Sultana' have the Waldron family recorded as: Alfred (30), Sarah (29), Sarah (7), Mercy(5), Emma (3) and Alfred (1).

Alfred migrated to Victoria was undoubtedly influenced by the discovery of gold being found in Australia, he was one of many thousands of fortune seekers who went to the alluvial diggings. Alfred tried gold digging around Bendigo, Beechworth and Chiltern, but was not very successful so turned his attention to a more profitable employment. He bought some land and a herd of cows and sold milk to the miners at 2s.6p. per quart. During his stay in Chiltern he had contracts owning 4 one horse drays carting soil to form the road bed for the railway from Melbourne to Chiltern.

On the 2 January 1861, Alfred received a publican's licence for the Turf Hotel in Chiltern. The Turf Hotel was located on Wangaratta Road (later known as Melbourne Road before being called the Hume Highway up to 1960 when the Highway was relocated). The Turf Hotel was adjacent to the Chiltern Old Cemetery, which was about a mile out of town. The Turf Hotel did a steady trade from the miners at the nearby gold diggings at Doma Mungi and from the funeral parties that had to pass by the hotel on the way to the cemetery. The wakes were pretty jolly and those attending sometimes stayed the night. The Turf Hotel was later sold to a Martin Wenke and he renamed it the Doma Mungi Hotel. The hotel didn't last very long and went bust, mainly due to the relocation of the Chiltern Old Cemetery next door to the hotel, to a site back of the town of Chiltern, which was called the Chiltern New Cemetery. The hotel no longer exists. The reason for the cemeteries relocation was be cause of the rocky nature of the area being too difficult to dig a grave deep enough for a burial, and secondly, when it rained heavy, the ground would not absorb water and some of the coffins/bodies would work their way to the surface. Mr Wenke was very bitter over the loss.

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, January 20th, 1864. page 3 column 3. Advertisement: "WANTED Governess. Apply A. Waldron, Turf Hotel, near Chiltern Pound." (Add continued to appear until 29 January, 1864. Page 3, column 1.

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Monday, March 28th, 1864. Page 2 Column 1. "Died.- On Sunday 27th March, at the Turf Hotel, Chiltern, Mrs Alfred Waldron." ibid., page 3 column 3. "The friends of Mr Alfred Waldron are requested to follow the remains of his late wife to the Chiltern Cemetery, at three o'clock, this day. R.McLaclan, Undertaker."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Monday, April 13th, 1864. Page 3 column 3. "TENDERS, Ploughing 50 acres more or less, BRYANT farm, Indigo Creek. Address, A.Waldron, Star Hotel, Tenders opened 18th instant, 5 o'clock."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, May 11th 1864. Page 3, column 2. "WANTED, two or three BUSH CARPENTERS for putting up dwelling house and stockyards. Apply A. Waldron near Chiltern Pound."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, March 24th 1875. Page 3. column 3. "FOR SALE. Two young draft horses. Thoroughly staunch. Also tip dray. Apply to Alfred Waldron, Beechworth Road near Chiltern."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Saturday, July 17th, 1875. Page 2, column 3. "ITEM OF NEWS> We hear a change of property has taken place. Mr Waldron of the North-Eastern Refreshment Rooms at the corner of main and Conness Streets has sold to Mr J. Horn for the sum of 400 pounds; Mr Waldron having become the purchaser of Mr Horn's property for the sum of 280 pounds."

Reference supplied by Barry T. Deas of Rutherglen. The Rutherglen Sun and Chiltern Valley Advertiser, September 24th, 1886. WALDRON, Alfred "At the commencement of the old Indigo, was supplying the diggers with milk, and when the Chiltern then known as New Ballarat' was found, became a shareholder in one of the large engine claims known as the "Oriental". He afterwards erected the first hotel on the Melbourne Road, near the present site of Chiltern Pound in 1860, which he occupied for some years, combining dairying with his other business, and was amongst the first selectors who selected land at Docker's Plains. Now of Bungeworgorai Creek, Queensland."

Alfred married Mary McIntyre on 31st October, 1864. Mary, the daughter of Lauchlan McIntyre (boot-maker) and Helen McBeth, was born about 1836 at Braco, Perthsire, Scotland. Mary had arrived in the Colony about 1862 at the age of 26 years. I t is reported that Mary was housekeeping for Alfred after the death of Sarah. Her occupation on her marriage certificate lists 'domestic servant'. It is also reputed that Mary had red hair. Mary went to America intending to keep house fora relative (brother), however he had married by the time she arrived and she returned to Scotland. She then came to Australia and Daniel (her son) wrote that "when she landed she sat down on the sands and wept with loneliness and homesickness for Scotland".

Alfred Waldron had a lucky escape in Victoria on one occasion when he, in company with a 12 year old son, inspected a very attractive line of cattle. The vendor insisted on being paid in bank notes and seemed rather over insistent that Alfred leave his son behind while he returned to Chiltern to get the necessary bank notes. Alfred declined the offered hospitality and took the boy with him. While journeying to Chiltern he mentioned to a traveller along the road about the wonderfully cheap cattle he had bought, stating that he was returning to get the cash to pay for them. The traveller advised him to forget the deal as it was a trap for Dan MORGAN, the bushranger, to intercept him with the money on the wayback. The low priced cattle was merely a decoy to attract buyers.

Alfred eventually arrived in Queensland after travelling overland from Victoria in canvas covered wagons. Alfred & Mary and all of the family except Alfred's three daughters (who had married and remained In Victoria) made the journey north. Mary Waldron, gave birth to a son at Cantas Gully New South Wales during their year long Journey. Alfred purchased a place near Nanango from a man named Sullivan. The property was carrying sheep which he also bought. The sheep had to be shepherded all day and penned in dingo proof yards at night. However with dingoes, worms, and grass seeds that penetrated the sheep skin made the venture a failure so he sold out and the family moved on to take up various Selections (newly opened land available for purchase) near Roma.

Occupation

Original Entry:

1832 1841 Hobart Tasmania; Emerald Hill, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Occupation

(Queensland Electoral Roll 1903, Occupation Farmer, (with second wife Mary) Northern Road, Roma, Queensland)

Occupation

Alfred Benjamin Waldren & Family Letter by George Truscott * RHSV, COPY,MS 000054

Queensland Electoral Roll 1903, Occupation Farmer, (with second wife Mary) Northern Road, Roma, Queensland Arrived Port Philip with family on the maiden voyage of the Sultana,1316 ton, of White Star Line, DC Taylor, Liverpool 13 Sep 1854 Port Philip 12 Dec 1854. Letter by George Truscott * RHSV, COPY,MS 000054 / with 381 migrants. Emma's father, Alfred Waldron, had come to Australia on the sailing ship 'Sultana in 1854 on its maiden voyage, paying the fare for himself and his young family. Alfred first settled at Emerald Hill (now called South Melbourne) trading and dealing in horses. Alfred was reputed to have dealt in horses during his first stay in Melbourne and the day before he left for the goldfields he bought horses for 100 pounds and resold them the same day for 150 pounds. Unfortunately, not all his deals were successful. He missed the deal of a lifetime. He was offered a parcel of 10 acres of land at 1 pound an acre, the top price in those days. Unfortunately he declined the offer as it was very densely timbered and he thought the cost of clearing would be too great. This land is now situated in the heart of the city of Melbourne.

1856 finds Alfred Waldron and his family were in the Bogong Gold fields (Woodshed Valley Beechworth area), then onto the Indigo gold fields, nearer the Murray River. Alfred had mixed fortunes and about 1858 decided to return to Melbourne believing he could make more money in his old profession as a dealer in horses.

At the end of 1860 Alfred Waldron is at Chiltern where he was operating a dairy selling milk to the miners this being more profitable than scratching for gold although he still held shares in deep mining at Chiltern. In 1861 he obtained a license to operate a hotel on the Wangaratta Road, near the racetrack just outside Chiltern - hence the name the 'Turf Hotel'. This he operated successfully in conjunction with his dairying until 1864, when he lost his wife Sarah (Gardener)and three of his sons all in the same year. Alfred married Mary McIntyre and later farmed' at Escort, Victoria (near Chiltern), still having some interests at Chiltern, eventually moving back to that town . The Eight Annual Show atChiltern, Barnawaratha, and Indigo, Horticultural and Agriculture Society which was held in February 1871. The History of Chiltern says the show was a great success and indicates an effort of settlement and farming. Great interest was showing cattle by the Judges Jason Withers, John O'Neill and Alfred Waldron. CHILTERN FRIDAY APRIL 15 1870 The Perseverance Steam Saw Mill Near the Chiltern Pound A. WALDRON Has to announce to the public that he has erected the above Stem Saw Mill and is now able to supply, in any quantity, And at the most moderate prices

ALL KINDS OF TIMBER Including the best Murray pine

Chiltern Friday April 15 1870

NEW INSOLVENT Alfred Waldron Chiltern, formerly farmer Now sawyer. Causes of insolvency - Losses in business and in hiring a threshing Machine. Liabilities, seven hundred and fifty Two pounds, assets, eighty eight pounds six Shillings, deficiency six hundred and sixty Four pounds nine shillings. Mr John Turner Official Assignee.

Saturday 1st February 1879

FURNITURE FURNITURE Alex McLeery Has received instructions from Mr A Waldron To sell by public auction, on the above date, At the Chiltern Valley Hotel, the whole of his Household.

FURNITURE And effects, comprising billiard table, bagatelle Table, chairs sofas tables, bedsteads, palliasses, Pictures tumblers, meat safes, clocks, kitchen utensils And three large water tanks. Also three milch cows With calves at foot. Lot of four and five year old Bullocks, six well bred pigs (large size), Half ton cheese, Fowls etc. Also saddle and draught horses, dray harness, Saddles and bridles also sundries. The Auctioneer desires to draw special attention to the Above sale, as all goods names are in first class Condition and nearly new. Sale at 12 o”clock

In1879, Alfred sold up his Victorian interests and travelled overland to Queensland

Alfred's christening details have not been found. On his death certificate, it records his place of birth as Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England. Stourbridge was a small hamlet next to the village of Old Swinford. On the marriage certificate to Sarah Gardner, Alfred's father is recorded as James Waldron.

It was reported that Alfred travelled throughout England and Wales, attending various horse fairs as a horse dealer. It was a risky business in those days as money for transactions had to be carried in cash, usually gold. On one occasion Alfred had a narrow escape when he sold a large number of horses and was carrying considerable amount of cash. There was only one inn situated in the village which the fair was held, but the hour was late and he was forced by circumstances to avail himself of the accommodation there. It looked by no means impressive and the innkeeper was, to put it mildly, the type to immediately arouse one's suspicions and added to this there were no locks on the door. It was the custom in those days for horse dealers to carry horse pistols. These were about a foot long and were loaded on the same principal as a muzzle loader gun. Alfred on this occasion was unarmed, but his impression of the innkeeper warned him to take the precaution of barricading the door with all the furniture of the room. About the hour of midnight, he heard someone try the door. He immediately challenged the intending intruder, but getting no answer, threatened to shoot should he try to enter. There was a candle stick in the room and he used the old fashioned candle ejector with which to make a noise similar to the cocking of a pistol. It can hardly be said that he spent a comfortable night and he felt even less comfortable soon afterwards when this particular inn was burnt down and several human skeletons were found in the cellar.

Alfred was married twice and had children from both marriages. His first wife was Sarah GARDNER and they had 10 children: Sarah (b. Abet 1846), Mercy (b. Abet 1848), Emma (b. Abet 1850), Alfred (b Abet 1852), William (dead before 1865) Joseph(b . Abet 1857), Henry (b. Abet 1859), Edward (b Abet 1861), Thomas (dead before 1865), John ?. Sarah and Alfred were married in England. Alfred was then 19 years of age.

Alfred, Sarah Gardner (his wife), and their children Sarah, Mercy, Emma and Alfred arrived in Sydney as unassisted migrants in December 1854 on the ship 'Sultana'. During the long voyage, Emma (my grandmother) nearly died and the family were prepared to bury her at sea, however she survived and had a long and fruitful life. The records of the 'Sultana' have the Waldron family recorded as: Alfred (30), Sarah (29), Sarah (7), Mercy(5), Emma (3) and Alfred (1).

Alfred migrated to Victoria was undoubtedly influenced by the discovery of gold being found in Australia, he was one of many thousands of fortune seekers who went to the alluvial diggings. Alfred tried gold digging around Bendigo, Beechworth and Chiltern, but was not very successful so turned his attention to a more profitable employment. He bought some land and a herd of cows and sold milk to the miners at 2s.6p. per quart. During his stay in Chiltern he had contracts owning 4 one horse drays carting soil to form the road bed for the railway from Melbourne to Chiltern.

On the 2 January 1861, Alfred received a publican's licence for the Turf Hotel in Chiltern. The Turf Hotel was located on Wangaratta Road (later known as Melbourne Road before being called the Hume Highway up to 1960 when the Highway was relocated). The Turf Hotel was adjacent to the Chiltern Old Cemetery, which was about a mile out of town. The Turf Hotel did a steady trade from the miners at the nearby gold diggings at Doma Mungi and from the funeral parties that had to pass by the hotel on the way to the cemetery. The wakes were pretty jolly and those attending sometimes stayed the night. The Turf Hotel was later sold to a Martin Wenke and he renamed it the Doma Mungi Hotel. The hotel didn't last very long and went bust, mainly due to the relocation of the Chiltern Old Cemetery next door to the hotel, to a site back of the town of Chiltern, which was called the Chiltern New Cemetery. The hotel no longer exists. The reason for the cemeteries relocation was be cause of the rocky nature of the area being too difficult to dig a grave deep enough for a burial, and secondly, when it rained heavy, the ground would not absorb water and some of the coffins/bodies would work their way to the surface. Mr Wenke was very bitter over the loss.

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, January 20th, 1864. page 3 column 3. Advertisement: "WANTED Governess. Apply A. Waldron, Turf Hotel, near Chiltern Pound." (Add continued to appear until 29 January, 1864. Page 3, column 1.

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Monday, March 28th, 1864. Page 2 Column 1. "Died.- On Sunday 27th March, at the Turf Hotel, Chiltern, Mrs Alfred Waldron." ibid., page 3 column 3. "The friends of Mr Alfred Waldron are requested to follow the remains of his late wife to the Chiltern Cemetery, at three o'clock, this day. R.McLaclan, Undertaker."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Monday, April 13th, 1864. Page 3 column 3. "TENDERS, Ploughing 50 acres more or less, BRYANT farm, Indigo Creek. Address, A.Waldron, Star Hotel, Tenders opened 18th instant, 5 o'clock."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, May 11th 1864. Page 3, column 2. "WANTED, two or three BUSH CARPENTERS for putting up dwelling house and stockyards. Apply A. Waldron near Chiltern Pound."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, March 24th 1875. Page 3. column 3. "FOR SALE. Two young draft horses. Thoroughly staunch. Also tip dray. Apply to Alfred Waldron, Beechworth Road near Chiltern."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Saturday, July 17th, 1875. Page 2, column 3. "ITEM OF NEWS> We hear a change of property has taken place. Mr Waldron of the North-Eastern Refreshment Rooms at the corner of main and Conness Streets has sold to Mr J. Horn for the sum of 400 pounds; Mr Waldron having become the purchaser of Mr Horn's property for the sum of 280 pounds."

Reference supplied by Barry T. Deas of Rutherglen. The Rutherglen Sun and Chiltern Valley Advertiser, September 24th, 1886. WALDRON, Alfred "At the commencement of the old Indigo, was supplying the diggers with milk, and when the Chiltern then known as New Ballarat' was found, became a shareholder in one of the large engine claims known as the "Oriental". He afterwards erected the first hotel on the Melbourne Road, near the present site of Chiltern Pound in 1860, which he occupied for some years, combining dairying with his other business, and was amongst the first selectors who selected land at Docker's Plains. Now of Bungeworgorai Creek, Queensland."

Alfred married Mary McIntyre on 31st October, 1864. Mary, the daughter of Lauchlan McIntyre (boot-maker) and Helen McBeth, was born about 1836 at Braco, Perthsire, Scotland. Mary had arrived in the Colony about 1862 at the age of 26 years. I t is reported that Mary was housekeeping for Alfred after the death of Sarah. Her occupation on her marriage certificate lists 'domestic servant'. It is also reputed that Mary had red hair. Mary went to America intending to keep house fora relative (brother), however he had married by the time she arrived and she returned to Scotland. She then came to Australia and Daniel (her son) wrote that "when she landed she sat down on the sands and wept with loneliness and homesickness for Scotland".

Alfred Waldron had a lucky escape in Victoria on one occasion when he, in company with a 12 year old son, inspected a very attractive line of cattle. The vendor insisted on being paid in bank notes and seemed rather over insistent that Alfred leave his son behind while he returned to Chiltern to get the necessary bank notes. Alfred declined the offered hospitality and took the boy with him. While journeying to Chiltern he mentioned to a traveller along the road about the wonderfully cheap cattle he had bought, stating that he was returning to get the cash to pay for them. The traveller advised him to forget the deal as it was a trap for Dan MORGAN, the bushranger, to intercept him with the money on the wayback. The low priced cattle was merely a decoy to attract buyers.

Alfred eventually arrived in Queensland after travelling overland from Victoria in canvas covered wagons. Alfred & Mary and all of the family except Alfred's three daughters (who had married and remained In Victoria) made the journey north. Mary Waldron, gave birth to a son at Cantas Gully New South Wales during their year long Journey. Alfred purchased a place near Nanango from a man named Sullivan. The property was carrying sheep which he also bought. The sheep had to be shepherded all day and penned in dingo proof yards at night. However with dingoes, worms, and grass seeds that penetrated the sheep skin made the venture a failure so he sold out and the family moved on to take up various Selections (newly opened land available for purchase) near Roma.

Occupation

Alfred Benjamin Waldren & Family Letter by George Truscott * RHSV, COPY,MS 000054

Queensland Electoral Roll 1903, Occupation Farmer, (with second wife Mary) Northern Road, Roma, Queensland Arrived Port Philip with family on the maiden voyage of the Sultana,1316 ton, of White Star Line, DC Taylor, Liverpool 13 Sep 1854 Port Philip 12 Dec 1854. Letter by George Truscott * RHSV, COPY,MS 000054 / with 381 migrants. Emma's father, Alfred Waldron, had come to Australia on the sailing ship 'Sultana in 1854 on its maiden voyage, paying the fare for himself and his young family. Alfred first settled at Emerald Hill (now called South Melbourne) trading and dealing in horses. Alfred was reputed to have dealt in horses during his first stay in Melbourne and the day before he left for the goldfields he bought horses for 100 pounds and resold them the same day for 150 pounds. Unfortunately, not all his deals were successful. He missed the deal of a lifetime. He was offered a parcel of 10 acres of land at 1 pound an acre, the top price in those days. Unfortunately he declined the offer as it was very densely timbered and he thought the cost of clearing would be too great. This land is now situated in the heart of the city of Melbourne.

1856 finds Alfred Waldron and his family were in the Bogong Gold fields (Woodshed Valley Beechworth area), then onto the Indigo gold fields, nearer the Murray River. Alfred had mixed fortunes and about 1858 decided to return to Melbourne believing he could make more money in his old profession as a dealer in horses.

At the end of 1860 Alfred Waldron is at Chiltern where he was operating a dairy selling milk to the miners this being more profitable than scratching for gold although he still held shares in deep mining at Chiltern. In 1861 he obtained a license to operate a hotel on the Wangaratta Road, near the racetrack just outside Chiltern - hence the name the 'Turf Hotel'. This he operated successfully in conjunction with his dairying until 1864, when he lost his wife Sarah (Gardener)and three of his sons all in the same year. Alfred married Mary McIntyre and later farmed' at Escort, Victoria (near Chiltern), still having some interests at Chiltern, eventually moving back to that town . The Eight Annual Show atChiltern, Barnawaratha, and Indigo, Horticultural and Agriculture Society which was held in February 1871. The History of Chiltern says the show was a great success and indicates an effort of settlement and farming. Great interest was showing cattle by the Judges Jason Withers, John O'Neill and Alfred Waldron. CHILTERN FRIDAY APRIL 15 1870 The Perseverance Steam Saw Mill Near the Chiltern Pound A. WALDRON Has to announce to the public that he has erected the above Stem Saw Mill and is now able to supply, in any quantity, And at the most moderate prices

ALL KINDS OF TIMBER Including the best Murray pine

Chiltern Friday April 15 1870

NEW INSOLVENT Alfred Waldron Chiltern, formerly farmer Now sawyer. Causes of insolvency - Losses in business and in hiring a threshing Machine. Liabilities, seven hundred and fifty Two pounds, assets, eighty eight pounds six Shillings, deficiency six hundred and sixty Four pounds nine shillings. Mr John Turner Official Assignee.

Saturday 1st February 1879

FURNITURE FURNITURE Alex McLeery Has received instructions from Mr A Waldron To sell by public auction, on the above date, At the Chiltern Valley Hotel, the whole of his Household.

FURNITURE And effects, comprising billiard table, bagatelle Table, chairs sofas tables, bedsteads, palliasses, Pictures tumblers, meat safes, clocks, kitchen utensils And three large water tanks. Also three milch cows With calves at foot. Lot of four and five year old Bullocks, six well bred pigs (large size), Half ton cheese, Fowls etc. Also saddle and draught horses, dray harness, Saddles and bridles also sundries. The Auctioneer desires to draw special attention to the Above sale, as all goods names are in first class Condition and nearly new. Sale at 12 o”clock

In1879, Alfred sold up his Victorian interests and travelled overland to Queensland

Alfred's christening details have not been found. On his death certificate, it records his place of birth as Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England. Stourbridge was a small hamlet next to the village of Old Swinford. On the marriage certificate to Sarah Gardner, Alfred's father is recorded as James Waldron.

It was reported that Alfred travelled throughout England and Wales, attending various horse fairs as a horse dealer. It was a risky business in those days as money for transactions had to be carried in cash, usually gold. On one occasion Alfred had a narrow escape when he sold a large number of horses and was carrying considerable amount of cash. There was only one inn situated in the village which the fair was held, but the hour was late and he was forced by circumstances to avail himself of the accommodation there. It looked by no means impressive and the innkeeper was, to put it mildly, the type to immediately arouse one's suspicions and added to this there were no locks on the door. It was the custom in those days for horse dealers to carry horse pistols. These were about a foot long and were loaded on the same principal as a muzzle loader gun. Alfred on this occasion was unarmed, but his impression of the innkeeper warned him to take the precaution of barricading the door with all the furniture of the room. About the hour of midnight, he heard someone try the door. He immediately challenged the intending intruder, but getting no answer, threatened to shoot should he try to enter. There was a candle stick in the room and he used the old fashioned candle ejector with which to make a noise similar to the cocking of a pistol. It can hardly be said that he spent a comfortable night and he felt even less comfortable soon afterwards when this particular inn was burnt down and several human skeletons were found in the cellar.

Alfred was married twice and had children from both marriages. His first wife was Sarah GARDNER and they had 10 children: Sarah (b. Abet 1846), Mercy (b. Abet 1848), Emma (b. Abet 1850), Alfred (b Abet 1852), William (dead before 1865) Joseph(b . Abet 1857), Henry (b. Abet 1859), Edward (b Abet 1861), Thomas (dead before 1865), John ?. Sarah and Alfred were married in England. Alfred was then 19 years of age.

Alfred, Sarah Gardner (his wife), and their children Sarah, Mercy, Emma and Alfred arrived in Sydney as unassisted migrants in December 1854 on the ship 'Sultana'. During the long voyage, Emma (my grandmother) nearly died and the family were prepared to bury her at sea, however she survived and had a long and fruitful life. The records of the 'Sultana' have the Waldron family recorded as: Alfred (30), Sarah (29), Sarah (7), Mercy(5), Emma (3) and Alfred (1).

Alfred migrated to Victoria was undoubtedly influenced by the discovery of gold being found in Australia, he was one of many thousands of fortune seekers who went to the alluvial diggings. Alfred tried gold digging around Bendigo, Beechworth and Chiltern, but was not very successful so turned his attention to a more profitable employment. He bought some land and a herd of cows and sold milk to the miners at 2s.6p. per quart. During his stay in Chiltern he had contracts owning 4 one horse drays carting soil to form the road bed for the railway from Melbourne to Chiltern.

On the 2 January 1861, Alfred received a publican's licence for the Turf Hotel in Chiltern. The Turf Hotel was located on Wangaratta Road (later known as Melbourne Road before being called the Hume Highway up to 1960 when the Highway was relocated). The Turf Hotel was adjacent to the Chiltern Old Cemetery, which was about a mile out of town. The Turf Hotel did a steady trade from the miners at the nearby gold diggings at Doma Mungi and from the funeral parties that had to pass by the hotel on the way to the cemetery. The wakes were pretty jolly and those attending sometimes stayed the night. The Turf Hotel was later sold to a Martin Wenke and he renamed it the Doma Mungi Hotel. The hotel didn't last very long and went bust, mainly due to the relocation of the Chiltern Old Cemetery next door to the hotel, to a site back of the town of Chiltern, which was called the Chiltern New Cemetery. The hotel no longer exists. The reason for the cemeteries relocation was be cause of the rocky nature of the area being too difficult to dig a grave deep enough for a burial, and secondly, when it rained heavy, the ground would not absorb water and some of the coffins/bodies would work their way to the surface. Mr Wenke was very bitter over the loss.

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, January 20th, 1864. page 3 column 3. Advertisement: "WANTED Governess. Apply A. Waldron, Turf Hotel, near Chiltern Pound." (Add continued to appear until 29 January, 1864. Page 3, column 1.

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Monday, March 28th, 1864. Page 2 Column 1. "Died.- On Sunday 27th March, at the Turf Hotel, Chiltern, Mrs Alfred Waldron." ibid., page 3 column 3. "The friends of Mr Alfred Waldron are requested to follow the remains of his late wife to the Chiltern Cemetery, at three o'clock, this day. R.McLaclan, Undertaker."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Monday, April 13th, 1864. Page 3 column 3. "TENDERS, Ploughing 50 acres more or less, BRYANT farm, Indigo Creek. Address, A.Waldron, Star Hotel, Tenders opened 18th instant, 5 o'clock."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, May 11th 1864. Page 3, column 2. "WANTED, two or three BUSH CARPENTERS for putting up dwelling house and stockyards. Apply A. Waldron near Chiltern Pound."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, March 24th 1875. Page 3. column 3. "FOR SALE. Two young draft horses. Thoroughly staunch. Also tip dray. Apply to Alfred Waldron, Beechworth Road near Chiltern."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Saturday, July 17th, 1875. Page 2, column 3. "ITEM OF NEWS> We hear a change of property has taken place. Mr Waldron of the North-Eastern Refreshment Rooms at the corner of main and Conness Streets has sold to Mr J. Horn for the sum of 400 pounds; Mr Waldron having become the purchaser of Mr Horn's property for the sum of 280 pounds."

Reference supplied by Barry T. Deas of Rutherglen. The Rutherglen Sun and Chiltern Valley Advertiser, September 24th, 1886. WALDRON, Alfred "At the commencement of the old Indigo, was supplying the diggers with milk, and when the Chiltern then known as New Ballarat' was found, became a shareholder in one of the large engine claims known as the "Oriental". He afterwards erected the first hotel on the Melbourne Road, near the present site of Chiltern Pound in 1860, which he occupied for some years, combining dairying with his other business, and was amongst the first selectors who selected land at Docker's Plains. Now of Bungeworgorai Creek, Queensland."

Alfred married Mary McIntyre on 31st October, 1864. Mary, the daughter of Lauchlan McIntyre (boot-maker) and Helen McBeth, was born about 1836 at Braco, Perthsire, Scotland. Mary had arrived in the Colony about 1862 at the age of 26 years. I t is reported that Mary was housekeeping for Alfred after the death of Sarah. Her occupation on her marriage certificate lists 'domestic servant'. It is also reputed that Mary had red hair. Mary went to America intending to keep house fora relative (brother), however he had married by the time she arrived and she returned to Scotland. She then came to Australia and Daniel (her son) wrote that "when she landed she sat down on the sands and wept with loneliness and homesickness for Scotland".

Alfred Waldron had a lucky escape in Victoria on one occasion when he, in company with a 12 year old son, inspected a very attractive line of cattle. The vendor insisted on being paid in bank notes and seemed rather over insistent that Alfred leave his son behind while he returned to Chiltern to get the necessary bank notes. Alfred declined the offered hospitality and took the boy with him. While journeying to Chiltern he mentioned to a traveller along the road about the wonderfully cheap cattle he had bought, stating that he was returning to get the cash to pay for them. The traveller advised him to forget the deal as it was a trap for Dan MORGAN, the bushranger, to intercept him with the money on the wayback. The low priced cattle was merely a decoy to attract buyers.

Alfred eventually arrived in Queensland after travelling overland from Victoria in canvas covered wagons. Alfred & Mary and all of the family except Alfred's three daughters (who had married and remained In Victoria) made the journey north. Mary Waldron, gave birth to a son at Cantas Gully New South Wales during their year long Journey. Alfred purchased a place near Nanango from a man named Sullivan. The property was carrying sheep which he also bought. The sheep had to be shepherded all day and penned in dingo proof yards at night. However with dingoes, worms, and grass seeds that penetrated the sheep skin made the venture a failure so he sold out and the family moved on to take up various Selections (newly opened land available for purchase) near Roma.

Occupation

Alfred Benjamin Waldren & Family Letter by George Truscott * RHSV, COPY,MS 000054

Queensland Electoral Roll 1903, Occupation Farmer, (with second wife Mary) Northern Road, Roma, Queensland Arrived Port Philip with family on the maiden voyage of the Sultana,1316 ton, of White Star Line, DC Taylor, Liverpool 13 Sep 1854 Port Philip 12 Dec 1854. Letter by George Truscott * RHSV, COPY,MS 000054 / with 381 migrants. Emma's father, Alfred Waldron, had come to Australia on the sailing ship 'Sultana in 1854 on its maiden voyage, paying the fare for himself and his young family. Alfred first settled at Emerald Hill (now called South Melbourne) trading and dealing in horses. Alfred was reputed to have dealt in horses during his first stay in Melbourne and the day before he left for the goldfields he bought horses for 100 pounds and resold them the same day for 150 pounds. Unfortunately, not all his deals were successful. He missed the deal of a lifetime. He was offered a parcel of 10 acres of land at 1 pound an acre, the top price in those days. Unfortunately he declined the offer as it was very densely timbered and he thought the cost of clearing would be too great. This land is now situated in the heart of the city of Melbourne.

1856 finds Alfred Waldron and his family were in the Bogong Gold fields (Woodshed Valley Beechworth area), then onto the Indigo gold fields, nearer the Murray River. Alfred had mixed fortunes and about 1858 decided to return to Melbourne believing he could make more money in his old profession as a dealer in horses.

At the end of 1860 Alfred Waldron is at Chiltern where he was operating a dairy selling milk to the miners this being more profitable than scratching for gold although he still held shares in deep mining at Chiltern. In 1861 he obtained a license to operate a hotel on the Wangaratta Road, near the racetrack just outside Chiltern - hence the name the 'Turf Hotel'. This he operated successfully in conjunction with his dairying until 1864, when he lost his wife Sarah (Gardener)and three of his sons all in the same year. Alfred married Mary McIntyre and later farmed' at Escort, Victoria (near Chiltern), still having some interests at Chiltern, eventually moving back to that town . The Eight Annual Show atChiltern, Barnawaratha, and Indigo, Horticultural and Agriculture Society which was held in February 1871. The History of Chiltern says the show was a great success and indicates an effort of settlement and farming. Great interest was showing cattle by the Judges Jason Withers, John O'Neill and Alfred Waldron. CHILTERN FRIDAY APRIL 15 1870 The Perseverance Steam Saw Mill Near the Chiltern Pound A. WALDRON Has to announce to the public that he has erected the above Stem Saw Mill and is now able to supply, in any quantity, And at the most moderate prices

ALL KINDS OF TIMBER Including the best Murray pine

Chiltern Friday April 15 1870

NEW INSOLVENT Alfred Waldron Chiltern, formerly farmer Now sawyer. Causes of insolvency - Losses in business and in hiring a threshing Machine. Liabilities, seven hundred and fifty Two pounds, assets, eighty eight pounds six Shillings, deficiency six hundred and sixty Four pounds nine shillings. Mr John Turner Official Assignee.

Saturday 1st February 1879

FURNITURE FURNITURE Alex McLeery Has received instructions from Mr A Waldron To sell by public auction, on the above date, At the Chiltern Valley Hotel, the whole of his Household.

FURNITURE And effects, comprising billiard table, bagatelle Table, chairs sofas tables, bedsteads, palliasses, Pictures tumblers, meat safes, clocks, kitchen utensils And three large water tanks. Also three milch cows With calves at foot. Lot of four and five year old Bullocks, six well bred pigs (large size), Half ton cheese, Fowls etc. Also saddle and draught horses, dray harness, Saddles and bridles also sundries. The Auctioneer desires to draw special attention to the Above sale, as all goods names are in first class Condition and nearly new. Sale at 12 o”clock

In1879, Alfred sold up his Victorian interests and travelled overland to Queensland

Alfred's christening details have not been found. On his death certificate, it records his place of birth as Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England. Stourbridge was a small hamlet next to the village of Old Swinford. On the marriage certificate to Sarah Gardner, Alfred's father is recorded as James Waldron.

It was reported that Alfred travelled throughout England and Wales, attending various horse fairs as a horse dealer. It was a risky business in those days as money for transactions had to be carried in cash, usually gold. On one occasion Alfred had a narrow escape when he sold a large number of horses and was carrying considerable amount of cash. There was only one inn situated in the village which the fair was held, but the hour was late and he was forced by circumstances to avail himself of the accommodation there. It looked by no means impressive and the innkeeper was, to put it mildly, the type to immediately arouse one's suspicions and added to this there were no locks on the door. It was the custom in those days for horse dealers to carry horse pistols. These were about a foot long and were loaded on the same principal as a muzzle loader gun. Alfred on this occasion was unarmed, but his impression of the innkeeper warned him to take the precaution of barricading the door with all the furniture of the room. About the hour of midnight, he heard someone try the door. He immediately challenged the intending intruder, but getting no answer, threatened to shoot should he try to enter. There was a candle stick in the room and he used the old fashioned candle ejector with which to make a noise similar to the cocking of a pistol. It can hardly be said that he spent a comfortable night and he felt even less comfortable soon afterwards when this particular inn was burnt down and several human skeletons were found in the cellar.

Alfred was married twice and had children from both marriages. His first wife was Sarah GARDNER and they had 10 children: Sarah (b. Abet 1846), Mercy (b. Abet 1848), Emma (b. Abet 1850), Alfred (b Abet 1852), William (dead before 1865) Joseph(b . Abet 1857), Henry (b. Abet 1859), Edward (b Abet 1861), Thomas (dead before 1865), John ?. Sarah and Alfred were married in England. Alfred was then 19 years of age.

Alfred, Sarah Gardner (his wife), and their children Sarah, Mercy, Emma and Alfred arrived in Sydney as unassisted migrants in December 1854 on the ship 'Sultana'. During the long voyage, Emma (my grandmother) nearly died and the family were prepared to bury her at sea, however she survived and had a long and fruitful life. The records of the 'Sultana' have the Waldron family recorded as: Alfred (30), Sarah (29), Sarah (7), Mercy(5), Emma (3) and Alfred (1).

Alfred migrated to Victoria was undoubtedly influenced by the discovery of gold being found in Australia, he was one of many thousands of fortune seekers who went to the alluvial diggings. Alfred tried gold digging around Bendigo, Beechworth and Chiltern, but was not very successful so turned his attention to a more profitable employment. He bought some land and a herd of cows and sold milk to the miners at 2s.6p. per quart. During his stay in Chiltern he had contracts owning 4 one horse drays carting soil to form the road bed for the railway from Melbourne to Chiltern.

On the 2 January 1861, Alfred received a publican's licence for the Turf Hotel in Chiltern. The Turf Hotel was located on Wangaratta Road (later known as Melbourne Road before being called the Hume Highway up to 1960 when the Highway was relocated). The Turf Hotel was adjacent to the Chiltern Old Cemetery, which was about a mile out of town. The Turf Hotel did a steady trade from the miners at the nearby gold diggings at Doma Mungi and from the funeral parties that had to pass by the hotel on the way to the cemetery. The wakes were pretty jolly and those attending sometimes stayed the night. The Turf Hotel was later sold to a Martin Wenke and he renamed it the Doma Mungi Hotel. The hotel didn't last very long and went bust, mainly due to the relocation of the Chiltern Old Cemetery next door to the hotel, to a site back of the town of Chiltern, which was called the Chiltern New Cemetery. The hotel no longer exists. The reason for the cemeteries relocation was be cause of the rocky nature of the area being too difficult to dig a grave deep enough for a burial, and secondly, when it rained heavy, the ground would not absorb water and some of the coffins/bodies would work their way to the surface. Mr Wenke was very bitter over the loss.

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, January 20th, 1864. page 3 column 3. Advertisement: "WANTED Governess. Apply A. Waldron, Turf Hotel, near Chiltern Pound." (Add continued to appear until 29 January, 1864. Page 3, column 1.

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Monday, March 28th, 1864. Page 2 Column 1. "Died.- On Sunday 27th March, at the Turf Hotel, Chiltern, Mrs Alfred Waldron." ibid., page 3 column 3. "The friends of Mr Alfred Waldron are requested to follow the remains of his late wife to the Chiltern Cemetery, at three o'clock, this day. R.McLaclan, Undertaker."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Monday, April 13th, 1864. Page 3 column 3. "TENDERS, Ploughing 50 acres more or less, BRYANT farm, Indigo Creek. Address, A.Waldron, Star Hotel, Tenders opened 18th instant, 5 o'clock."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, May 11th 1864. Page 3, column 2. "WANTED, two or three BUSH CARPENTERS for putting up dwelling house and stockyards. Apply A. Waldron near Chiltern Pound."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, March 24th 1875. Page 3. column 3. "FOR SALE. Two young draft horses. Thoroughly staunch. Also tip dray. Apply to Alfred Waldron, Beechworth Road near Chiltern."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Saturday, July 17th, 1875. Page 2, column 3. "ITEM OF NEWS> We hear a change of property has taken place. Mr Waldron of the North-Eastern Refreshment Rooms at the corner of main and Conness Streets has sold to Mr J. Horn for the sum of 400 pounds; Mr Waldron having become the purchaser of Mr Horn's property for the sum of 280 pounds."

Reference supplied by Barry T. Deas of Rutherglen. The Rutherglen Sun and Chiltern Valley Advertiser, September 24th, 1886. WALDRON, Alfred "At the commencement of the old Indigo, was supplying the diggers with milk, and when the Chiltern then known as New Ballarat' was found, became a shareholder in one of the large engine claims known as the "Oriental". He afterwards erected the first hotel on the Melbourne Road, near the present site of Chiltern Pound in 1860, which he occupied for some years, combining dairying with his other business, and was amongst the first selectors who selected land at Docker's Plains. Now of Bungeworgorai Creek, Queensland."

Alfred married Mary McIntyre on 31st October, 1864. Mary, the daughter of Lauchlan McIntyre (boot-maker) and Helen McBeth, was born about 1836 at Braco, Perthsire, Scotland. Mary had arrived in the Colony about 1862 at the age of 26 years. I t is reported that Mary was housekeeping for Alfred after the death of Sarah. Her occupation on her marriage certificate lists 'domestic servant'. It is also reputed that Mary had red hair. Mary went to America intending to keep house fora relative (brother), however he had married by the time she arrived and she returned to Scotland. She then came to Australia and Daniel (her son) wrote that "when she landed she sat down on the sands and wept with loneliness and homesickness for Scotland".

Alfred Waldron had a lucky escape in Victoria on one occasion when he, in company with a 12 year old son, inspected a very attractive line of cattle. The vendor insisted on being paid in bank notes and seemed rather over insistent that Alfred leave his son behind while he returned to Chiltern to get the necessary bank notes. Alfred declined the offered hospitality and took the boy with him. While journeying to Chiltern he mentioned to a traveller along the road about the wonderfully cheap cattle he had bought, stating that he was returning to get the cash to pay for them. The traveller advised him to forget the deal as it was a trap for Dan MORGAN, the bushranger, to intercept him with the money on the wayback. The low priced cattle was merely a decoy to attract buyers.

Alfred eventually arrived in Queensland after travelling overland from Victoria in canvas covered wagons. Alfred & Mary and all of the family except Alfred's three daughters (who had married and remained In Victoria) made the journey north. Mary Waldron, gave birth to a son at Cantas Gully New South Wales during their year long Journey. Alfred purchased a place near Nanango from a man named Sullivan. The property was carrying sheep which he also bought. The sheep had to be shepherded all day and penned in dingo proof yards at night. However with dingoes, worms, and grass seeds that penetrated the sheep skin made the venture a failure so he sold out and the family moved on to take up various Selections (newly opened land available for purchase) near Roma.

Occupation

Alfred Benjamin Waldren & Family Letter by George Truscott * RHSV, COPY,MS 000054

Queensland Electoral Roll 1903, Occupation Farmer, (with second wife Mary) Northern Road, Roma, Queensland Arrived Port Philip with family on the maiden voyage of the Sultana,1316 ton, of White Star Line, DC Taylor, Liverpool 13 Sep 1854 Port Philip 12 Dec 1854. Letter by George Truscott * RHSV, COPY,MS 000054 / with 381 migrants. Emma's father, Alfred Waldron, had come to Australia on the sailing ship 'Sultana in 1854 on its maiden voyage, paying the fare for himself and his young family. Alfred first settled at Emerald Hill (now called South Melbourne) trading and dealing in horses. Alfred was reputed to have dealt in horses during his first stay in Melbourne and the day before he left for the goldfields he bought horses for 100 pounds and resold them the same day for 150 pounds. Unfortunately, not all his deals were successful. He missed the deal of a lifetime. He was offered a parcel of 10 acres of land at 1 pound an acre, the top price in those days. Unfortunately he declined the offer as it was very densely timbered and he thought the cost of clearing would be too great. This land is now situated in the heart of the city of Melbourne.

1856 finds Alfred Waldron and his family were in the Bogong Gold fields (Woodshed Valley Beechworth area), then onto the Indigo gold fields, nearer the Murray River. Alfred had mixed fortunes and about 1858 decided to return to Melbourne believing he could make more money in his old profession as a dealer in horses.

At the end of 1860 Alfred Waldron is at Chiltern where he was operating a dairy selling milk to the miners this being more profitable than scratching for gold although he still held shares in deep mining at Chiltern. In 1861 he obtained a license to operate a hotel on the Wangaratta Road, near the racetrack just outside Chiltern - hence the name the 'Turf Hotel'. This he operated successfully in conjunction with his dairying until 1864, when he lost his wife Sarah (Gardener)and three of his sons all in the same year. Alfred married Mary McIntyre and later farmed' at Escort, Victoria (near Chiltern), still having some interests at Chiltern, eventually moving back to that town . The Eight Annual Show atChiltern, Barnawaratha, and Indigo, Horticultural and Agriculture Society which was held in February 1871. The History of Chiltern says the show was a great success and indicates an effort of settlement and farming. Great interest was showing cattle by the Judges Jason Withers, John O'Neill and Alfred Waldron. CHILTERN FRIDAY APRIL 15 1870 The Perseverance Steam Saw Mill Near the Chiltern Pound A. WALDRON Has to announce to the public that he has erected the above Stem Saw Mill and is now able to supply, in any quantity, And at the most moderate prices

ALL KINDS OF TIMBER Including the best Murray pine

Chiltern Friday April 15 1870

NEW INSOLVENT Alfred Waldron Chiltern, formerly farmer Now sawyer. Causes of insolvency - Losses in business and in hiring a threshing Machine. Liabilities, seven hundred and fifty Two pounds, assets, eighty eight pounds six Shillings, deficiency six hundred and sixty Four pounds nine shillings. Mr John Turner Official Assignee.

Saturday 1st February 1879

FURNITURE FURNITURE Alex McLeery Has received instructions from Mr A Waldron To sell by public auction, on the above date, At the Chiltern Valley Hotel, the whole of his Household.

FURNITURE And effects, comprising billiard table, bagatelle Table, chairs sofas tables, bedsteads, palliasses, Pictures tumblers, meat safes, clocks, kitchen utensils And three large water tanks. Also three milch cows With calves at foot. Lot of four and five year old Bullocks, six well bred pigs (large size), Half ton cheese, Fowls etc. Also saddle and draught horses, dray harness, Saddles and bridles also sundries. The Auctioneer desires to draw special attention to the Above sale, as all goods names are in first class Condition and nearly new. Sale at 12 o”clock

In1879, Alfred sold up his Victorian interests and travelled overland to Queensland

Alfred's christening details have not been found. On his death certificate, it records his place of birth as Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England. Stourbridge was a small hamlet next to the village of Old Swinford. On the marriage certificate to Sarah Gardner, Alfred's father is recorded as James Waldron.

It was reported that Alfred travelled throughout England and Wales, attending various horse fairs as a horse dealer. It was a risky business in those days as money for transactions had to be carried in cash, usually gold. On one occasion Alfred had a narrow escape when he sold a large number of horses and was carrying considerable amount of cash. There was only one inn situated in the village which the fair was held, but the hour was late and he was forced by circumstances to avail himself of the accommodation there. It looked by no means impressive and the innkeeper was, to put it mildly, the type to immediately arouse one's suspicions and added to this there were no locks on the door. It was the custom in those days for horse dealers to carry horse pistols. These were about a foot long and were loaded on the same principal as a muzzle loader gun. Alfred on this occasion was unarmed, but his impression of the innkeeper warned him to take the precaution of barricading the door with all the furniture of the room. About the hour of midnight, he heard someone try the door. He immediately challenged the intending intruder, but getting no answer, threatened to shoot should he try to enter. There was a candle stick in the room and he used the old fashioned candle ejector with which to make a noise similar to the cocking of a pistol. It can hardly be said that he spent a comfortable night and he felt even less comfortable soon afterwards when this particular inn was burnt down and several human skeletons were found in the cellar.

Alfred was married twice and had children from both marriages. His first wife was Sarah GARDNER and they had 10 children: Sarah (b. Abet 1846), Mercy (b. Abet 1848), Emma (b. Abet 1850), Alfred (b Abet 1852), William (dead before 1865) Joseph(b . Abet 1857), Henry (b. Abet 1859), Edward (b Abet 1861), Thomas (dead before 1865), John ?. Sarah and Alfred were married in England. Alfred was then 19 years of age.

Alfred, Sarah Gardner (his wife), and their children Sarah, Mercy, Emma and Alfred arrived in Sydney as unassisted migrants in December 1854 on the ship 'Sultana'. During the long voyage, Emma (my grandmother) nearly died and the family were prepared to bury her at sea, however she survived and had a long and fruitful life. The records of the 'Sultana' have the Waldron family recorded as: Alfred (30), Sarah (29), Sarah (7), Mercy(5), Emma (3) and Alfred (1).

Alfred migrated to Victoria was undoubtedly influenced by the discovery of gold being found in Australia, he was one of many thousands of fortune seekers who went to the alluvial diggings. Alfred tried gold digging around Bendigo, Beechworth and Chiltern, but was not very successful so turned his attention to a more profitable employment. He bought some land and a herd of cows and sold milk to the miners at 2s.6p. per quart. During his stay in Chiltern he had contracts owning 4 one horse drays carting soil to form the road bed for the railway from Melbourne to Chiltern.

On the 2 January 1861, Alfred received a publican's licence for the Turf Hotel in Chiltern. The Turf Hotel was located on Wangaratta Road (later known as Melbourne Road before being called the Hume Highway up to 1960 when the Highway was relocated). The Turf Hotel was adjacent to the Chiltern Old Cemetery, which was about a mile out of town. The Turf Hotel did a steady trade from the miners at the nearby gold diggings at Doma Mungi and from the funeral parties that had to pass by the hotel on the way to the cemetery. The wakes were pretty jolly and those attending sometimes stayed the night. The Turf Hotel was later sold to a Martin Wenke and he renamed it the Doma Mungi Hotel. The hotel didn't last very long and went bust, mainly due to the relocation of the Chiltern Old Cemetery next door to the hotel, to a site back of the town of Chiltern, which was called the Chiltern New Cemetery. The hotel no longer exists. The reason for the cemeteries relocation was be cause of the rocky nature of the area being too difficult to dig a grave deep enough for a burial, and secondly, when it rained heavy, the ground would not absorb water and some of the coffins/bodies would work their way to the surface. Mr Wenke was very bitter over the loss.

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, January 20th, 1864. page 3 column 3. Advertisement: "WANTED Governess. Apply A. Waldron, Turf Hotel, near Chiltern Pound." (Add continued to appear until 29 January, 1864. Page 3, column 1.

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Monday, March 28th, 1864. Page 2 Column 1. "Died.- On Sunday 27th March, at the Turf Hotel, Chiltern, Mrs Alfred Waldron." ibid., page 3 column 3. "The friends of Mr Alfred Waldron are requested to follow the remains of his late wife to the Chiltern Cemetery, at three o'clock, this day. R.McLaclan, Undertaker."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Monday, April 13th, 1864. Page 3 column 3. "TENDERS, Ploughing 50 acres more or less, BRYANT farm, Indigo Creek. Address, A.Waldron, Star Hotel, Tenders opened 18th instant, 5 o'clock."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, May 11th 1864. Page 3, column 2. "WANTED, two or three BUSH CARPENTERS for putting up dwelling house and stockyards. Apply A. Waldron near Chiltern Pound."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, March 24th 1875. Page 3. column 3. "FOR SALE. Two young draft horses. Thoroughly staunch. Also tip dray. Apply to Alfred Waldron, Beechworth Road near Chiltern."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Saturday, July 17th, 1875. Page 2, column 3. "ITEM OF NEWS> We hear a change of property has taken place. Mr Waldron of the North-Eastern Refreshment Rooms at the corner of main and Conness Streets has sold to Mr J. Horn for the sum of 400 pounds; Mr Waldron having become the purchaser of Mr Horn's property for the sum of 280 pounds."

Reference supplied by Barry T. Deas of Rutherglen. The Rutherglen Sun and Chiltern Valley Advertiser, September 24th, 1886. WALDRON, Alfred "At the commencement of the old Indigo, was supplying the diggers with milk, and when the Chiltern then known as New Ballarat' was found, became a shareholder in one of the large engine claims known as the "Oriental". He afterwards erected the first hotel on the Melbourne Road, near the present site of Chiltern Pound in 1860, which he occupied for some years, combining dairying with his other business, and was amongst the first selectors who selected land at Docker's Plains. Now of Bungeworgorai Creek, Queensland."

Alfred married Mary McIntyre on 31st October, 1864. Mary, the daughter of Lauchlan McIntyre (boot-maker) and Helen McBeth, was born about 1836 at Braco, Perthsire, Scotland. Mary had arrived in the Colony about 1862 at the age of 26 years. I t is reported that Mary was housekeeping for Alfred after the death of Sarah. Her occupation on her marriage certificate lists 'domestic servant'. It is also reputed that Mary had red hair. Mary went to America intending to keep house fora relative (brother), however he had married by the time she arrived and she returned to Scotland. She then came to Australia and Daniel (her son) wrote that "when she landed she sat down on the sands and wept with loneliness and homesickness for Scotland".

Alfred Waldron had a lucky escape in Victoria on one occasion when he, in company with a 12 year old son, inspected a very attractive line of cattle. The vendor insisted on being paid in bank notes and seemed rather over insistent that Alfred leave his son behind while he returned to Chiltern to get the necessary bank notes. Alfred declined the offered hospitality and took the boy with him. While journeying to Chiltern he mentioned to a traveller along the road about the wonderfully cheap cattle he had bought, stating that he was returning to get the cash to pay for them. The traveller advised him to forget the deal as it was a trap for Dan MORGAN, the bushranger, to intercept him with the money on the wayback. The low priced cattle was merely a decoy to attract buyers.

Alfred eventually arrived in Queensland after travelling overland from Victoria in canvas covered wagons. Alfred & Mary and all of the family except Alfred's three daughters (who had married and remained In Victoria) made the journey north. Mary Waldron, gave birth to a son at Cantas Gully New South Wales during their year long Journey. Alfred purchased a place near Nanango from a man named Sullivan. The property was carrying sheep which he also bought. The sheep had to be shepherded all day and penned in dingo proof yards at night. However with dingoes, worms, and grass seeds that penetrated the sheep skin made the venture a failure so he sold out and the family moved on to take up various Selections (newly opened land available for purchase) near Roma.

Shared note

Alfred Benjamin Waldren & Family Letter by George Truscott * RHSV, COPY,MS 000054

Queensland Electoral Roll 1903, Occupation Farmer, (with second wife Mary) Northern Road, Roma, Queensland Arrived Port Philip with family on the maiden voyage of the Sultana,1316 ton, of White Star Line, DC Taylor, Liverpool 13 Sep 1854 Port Philip 12 Dec 1854. Letter by George Truscott * RHSV, COPY,MS 000054 / with 381 migrants. Emma's father, Alfred Waldron, had come to Australia on the sailing ship 'Sultana in 1854 on its maiden voyage, paying the fare for himself and his young family. Alfred first settled at Emerald Hill (now called South Melbourne) trading and dealing in horses. Alfred was reputed to have dealt in horses during his first stay in Melbourne and the day before he left for the goldfields he bought horses for 100 pounds and resold them the same day for 150 pounds. Unfortunately, not all his deals were successful. He missed the deal of a lifetime. He was offered a parcel of 10 acres of land at 1 pound an acre, the top price in those days. Unfortunately he declined the offer as it was very densely timbered and he thought the cost of clearing would be too great. This land is now situated in the heart of the city of Melbourne.

1856 finds Alfred Waldron and his family were in the Bogong Gold fields (Woodshed Valley Beechworth area), then onto the Indigo gold fields, nearer the Murray River. Alfred had mixed fortunes and about 1858 decided to return to Melbourne believing he could make more money in his old profession as a dealer in horses.

At the end of 1860 Alfred Waldron is at Chiltern where he was operating a dairy selling milk to the miners this being more profitable than scratching for gold although he still held shares in deep mining at Chiltern. In 1861 he obtained a license to operate a hotel on the Wangaratta Road, near the racetrack just outside Chiltern - hence the name the 'Turf Hotel'. This he operated successfully in conjunction with his dairying until 1864, when he lost his wife Sarah (Gardener)and three of his sons all in the same year. Alfred married Mary McIntyre and later farmed' at Escort, Victoria (near Chiltern), still having some interests at Chiltern, eventually moving back to that town . The Eight Annual Show atChiltern, Barnawaratha, and Indigo, Horticultural and Agriculture Society which was held in February 1871. The History of Chiltern says the show was a great success and indicates an effort of settlement and farming. Great interest was showing cattle by the Judges Jason Withers, John O'Neill and Alfred Waldron. CHILTERN FRIDAY APRIL 15 1870 The Perseverance Steam Saw Mill Near the Chiltern Pound A. WALDRON Has to announce to the public that he has erected the above Stem Saw Mill and is now able to supply, in any quantity, And at the most moderate prices

ALL KINDS OF TIMBER Including the best Murray pine

Chiltern Friday April 15 1870

NEW INSOLVENT Alfred Waldron Chiltern, formerly farmer Now sawyer. Causes of insolvency - Losses in business and in hiring a threshing Machine. Liabilities, seven hundred and fifty Two pounds, assets, eighty eight pounds six Shillings, deficiency six hundred and sixty Four pounds nine shillings. Mr John Turner Official Assignee.

Saturday 1st February 1879

FURNITURE FURNITURE Alex McLeery Has received instructions from Mr A Waldron To sell by public auction, on the above date, At the Chiltern Valley Hotel, the whole of his Household.

FURNITURE And effects, comprising billiard table, bagatelle Table, chairs sofas tables, bedsteads, palliasses, Pictures tumblers, meat safes, clocks, kitchen utensils And three large water tanks. Also three milch cows With calves at foot. Lot of four and five year old Bullocks, six well bred pigs (large size), Half ton cheese, Fowls etc. Also saddle and draught horses, dray harness, Saddles and bridles also sundries. The Auctioneer desires to draw special attention to the Above sale, as all goods names are in first class Condition and nearly new. Sale at 12 o”clock

In1879, Alfred sold up his Victorian interests and travelled overland to Queensland

Alfred's christening details have not been found. On his death certificate, it records his place of birth as Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England. Stourbridge was a small hamlet next to the village of Old Swinford. On the marriage certificate to Sarah Gardner, Alfred's father is recorded as James Waldron.

It was reported that Alfred travelled throughout England and Wales, attending various horse fairs as a horse dealer. It was a risky business in those days as money for transactions had to be carried in cash, usually gold. On one occasion Alfred had a narrow escape when he sold a large number of horses and was carrying considerable amount of cash. There was only one inn situated in the village which the fair was held, but the hour was late and he was forced by circumstances to avail himself of the accommodation there. It looked by no means impressive and the innkeeper was, to put it mildly, the type to immediately arouse one's suspicions and added to this there were no locks on the door. It was the custom in those days for horse dealers to carry horse pistols. These were about a foot long and were loaded on the same principal as a muzzle loader gun. Alfred on this occasion was unarmed, but his impression of the innkeeper warned him to take the precaution of barricading the door with all the furniture of the room. About the hour of midnight, he heard someone try the door. He immediately challenged the intending intruder, but getting no answer, threatened to shoot should he try to enter. There was a candle stick in the room and he used the old fashioned candle ejector with which to make a noise similar to the cocking of a pistol. It can hardly be said that he spent a comfortable night and he felt even less comfortable soon afterwards when this particular inn was burnt down and several human skeletons were found in the cellar.

Alfred was married twice and had children from both marriages. His first wife was Sarah GARDNER and they had 10 children: Sarah (b. Abet 1846), Mercy (b. Abet 1848), Emma (b. Abet 1850), Alfred (b Abet 1852), William (dead before 1865) Joseph(b . Abet 1857), Henry (b. Abet 1859), Edward (b Abet 1861), Thomas (dead before 1865), John ?. Sarah and Alfred were married in England. Alfred was then 19 years of age.

Alfred, Sarah Gardner (his wife), and their children Sarah, Mercy, Emma and Alfred arrived in Sydney as unassisted migrants in December 1854 on the ship 'Sultana'. During the long voyage, Emma (my grandmother) nearly died and the family were prepared to bury her at sea, however she survived and had a long and fruitful life. The records of the 'Sultana' have the Waldron family recorded as: Alfred (30), Sarah (29), Sarah (7), Mercy(5), Emma (3) and Alfred (1).

Alfred migrated to Victoria was undoubtedly influenced by the discovery of gold being found in Australia, he was one of many thousands of fortune seekers who went to the alluvial diggings. Alfred tried gold digging around Bendigo, Beechworth and Chiltern, but was not very successful so turned his attention to a more profitable employment. He bought some land and a herd of cows and sold milk to the miners at 2s.6p. per quart. During his stay in Chiltern he had contracts owning 4 one horse drays carting soil to form the road bed for the railway from Melbourne to Chiltern.

On the 2 January 1861, Alfred received a publican's licence for the Turf Hotel in Chiltern. The Turf Hotel was located on Wangaratta Road (later known as Melbourne Road before being called the Hume Highway up to 1960 when the Highway was relocated). The Turf Hotel was adjacent to the Chiltern Old Cemetery, which was about a mile out of town. The Turf Hotel did a steady trade from the miners at the nearby gold diggings at Doma Mungi and from the funeral parties that had to pass by the hotel on the way to the cemetery. The wakes were pretty jolly and those attending sometimes stayed the night. The Turf Hotel was later sold to a Martin Wenke and he renamed it the Doma Mungi Hotel. The hotel didn't last very long and went bust, mainly due to the relocation of the Chiltern Old Cemetery next door to the hotel, to a site back of the town of Chiltern, which was called the Chiltern New Cemetery. The hotel no longer exists. The reason for the cemeteries relocation was be cause of the rocky nature of the area being too difficult to dig a grave deep enough for a burial, and secondly, when it rained heavy, the ground would not absorb water and some of the coffins/bodies would work their way to the surface. Mr Wenke was very bitter over the loss.

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, January 20th, 1864. page 3 column 3. Advertisement: "WANTED Governess. Apply A. Waldron, Turf Hotel, near Chiltern Pound." (Add continued to appear until 29 January, 1864. Page 3, column 1.

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Monday, March 28th, 1864. Page 2 Column 1. "Died.- On Sunday 27th March, at the Turf Hotel, Chiltern, Mrs Alfred Waldron." ibid., page 3 column 3. "The friends of Mr Alfred Waldron are requested to follow the remains of his late wife to the Chiltern Cemetery, at three o'clock, this day. R.McLaclan, Undertaker."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Monday, April 13th, 1864. Page 3 column 3. "TENDERS, Ploughing 50 acres more or less, BRYANT farm, Indigo Creek. Address, A.Waldron, Star Hotel, Tenders opened 18th instant, 5 o'clock."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, May 11th 1864. Page 3, column 2. "WANTED, two or three BUSH CARPENTERS for putting up dwelling house and stockyards. Apply A. Waldron near Chiltern Pound."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Wednesday, March 24th 1875. Page 3. column 3. "FOR SALE. Two young draft horses. Thoroughly staunch. Also tip dray. Apply to Alfred Waldron, Beechworth Road near Chiltern."

The Federal Standard Newspaper, Chiltern, Saturday, July 17th, 1875. Page 2, column 3. "ITEM OF NEWS> We hear a change of property has taken place. Mr Waldron of the North-Eastern Refreshment Rooms at the corner of main and Conness Streets has sold to Mr J. Horn for the sum of 400 pounds; Mr Waldron having become the purchaser of Mr Horn's property for the sum of 280 pounds."

Reference supplied by Barry T. Deas of Rutherglen. The Rutherglen Sun and Chiltern Valley Advertiser, September 24th, 1886. WALDRON, Alfred "At the commencement of the old Indigo, was supplying the diggers with milk, and when the Chiltern then known as New Ballarat' was found, became a shareholder in one of the large engine claims known as the "Oriental". He afterwards erected the first hotel on the Melbourne Road, near the present site of Chiltern Pound in 1860, which he occupied for some years, combining dairying with his other business, and was amongst the first selectors who selected land at Docker's Plains. Now of Bungeworgorai Creek, Queensland."

Alfred married Mary McIntyre on 31st October, 1864. Mary, the daughter of Lauchlan McIntyre (boot-maker) and Helen McBeth, was born about 1836 at Braco, Perthsire, Scotland. Mary had arrived in the Colony about 1862 at the age of 26 years. I t is reported that Mary was housekeeping for Alfred after the death of Sarah. Her occupation on her marriage certificate lists 'domestic servant'. It is also reputed that Mary had red hair. Mary went to America intending to keep house fora relative (brother), however he had married by the time she arrived and she returned to Scotland. She then came to Australia and Daniel (her son) wrote that "when she landed she sat down on the sands and wept with loneliness and homesickness for Scotland".

Alfred Waldron had a lucky escape in Victoria on one occasion when he, in company with a 12 year old son, inspected a very attractive line of cattle. The vendor insisted on being paid in bank notes and seemed rather over insistent that Alfred leave his son behind while he returned to Chiltern to get the necessary bank notes. Alfred declined the offered hospitality and took the boy with him. While journeying to Chiltern he mentioned to a traveller along the road about the wonderfully cheap cattle he had bought, stating that he was returning to get the cash to pay for them. The traveller advised him to forget the deal as it was a trap for Dan MORGAN, the bushranger, to intercept him with the money on the wayback. The low priced cattle was merely a decoy to attract buyers.

Alfred eventually arrived in Queensland after travelling overland from Victoria in canvas covered wagons. Alfred & Mary and all of the family except Alfred's three daughters (who had married and remained In Victoria) made the journey north. Mary Waldron, gave birth to a son at Cantas Gully New South Wales during their year long Journey. Alfred purchased a place near Nanango from a man named Sullivan. The property was carrying sheep which he also bought. The sheep had to be shepherded all day and penned in dingo proof yards at night. However with dingoes, worms, and grass seeds that penetrated the sheep skin made the venture a failure so he sold out and the family moved on to take up various Selections (newly opened land available for purchase) near Roma.

Shared note

Records not imported into INDI (individual) Gramps ID I6371:

Line ignored as not understood Line 303082: 2 NOTE Line ignored as not understood Line 303085: 2 NOTE

Shared note

!Mar ref. No.4156

Media objectAlfred Waldron
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