Harvey Family Tree 2018-04-30

John Harvey (Shipbuilder).jpg

John HarveyAge: 68 years18331901

Name
John Harvey
Given names
John
Surname
Harvey
Birth January 11, 1833 29 39
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Christening February 10, 1833 (Age 30 days)
Address: High Street
Birth of a brotherJoseph Martin Harvey
October 22, 1834 (Age 21 months)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Christening of a brotherJoseph Martin Harvey
November 3, 1834 (Age 21 months)
Address: High Street
Birth of a sisterCaroline Harvey
November 15, 1836 (Age 3 years)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Death of a half-sisterSarah Gowland
November 26, 1836 (Age 3 years)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Burial of a half-sisterSarah Gowland
November 28, 1836 (Age 3 years)
Christening of a sisterCaroline Harvey
February 5, 1837 (Age 4 years)
Address: High Street
Death of a maternal grandfatherJoseph Martin
October 23, 1838 (Age 5 years)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Death of a sisterCaroline Harvey
September 8, 1840 (Age 7 years)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Burial of a sisterCaroline Harvey
September 13, 1840 (Age 7 years)
Death of a paternal grandfatherRobert Harvey
December 20, 1840 (Age 7 years)
Death of a maternal grandmotherMary Cole
September 30, 1851 (Age 18 years)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

MarriageMargaret Diana Mary GoyderView this family
April 22, 1857 (Age 24 years)
Birth of a son
#1
John Harvey
March 8, 1859 (Age 26 years)
Death of a sonJohn Harvey
September 20, 1859 (Age 26 years)
Address: Bath Street
Burial of a sonJohn Harvey
September 22, 1859 (Age 26 years)
Birth of a daughter
#2
Edith Goyder Harvey
April 4, 1861 (Age 28 years)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Christening of a daughterEdith Goyder Harvey
April 1861 (Age 28 years)
Death of a motherMary Elizabeth Martin
February 1, 1862 (Age 29 years)
Birth of a son
#3
John Martin “JohnMartin-HarveyHarvey Sir
June 22, 1863 (Age 30 years)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Marriage of a parentThomas HarveySophia GriggsView this family
November 29, 1863 (Age 30 years)
Christening of a sonJohn Martin “JohnMartin-HarveyHarvey Sir
1863 (Age 29 years)
Birth of a half-brotherFred Harvey
January 29, 1865 (Age 32 years)
Christening of a half-brotherFred Harvey
April 9, 1865 (Age 32 years)
Birth of a daughter
#4
Mary Amelia Etherington “May” Harvey
August 17, 1865 (Age 32 years)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Death of a daughterEdith Goyder Harvey
November 17, 1865 (Age 32 years)
Burial of a daughterEdith Goyder Harvey
November 22, 1865 (Age 32 years)
Birth of a son
#5
David Gwyder “Gwy” Harvey
September 1867 (Age 34 years)
Christening of a sonDavid Gwyder “Gwy” Harvey
about 1867 (Age 33 years)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Birth of a daughter
#6
Florence Anna Harvey
April 16, 1869 (Age 36 years)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Christening of a daughterFlorence Anna Harvey
April 1869 (Age 36 years)
Death of a daughterFlorence Anna Harvey
September 30, 1869 (Age 36 years)
Burial of a daughterFlorence Anna Harvey
October 2, 1869 (Age 36 years)
Birth of a son
#7
Charles Woodroffe Harvey
July 18, 1870 (Age 37 years)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Christening of a sonCharles Woodroffe Harvey
July 19, 1870 (Age 37 years)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Death of a wifeMargaret Diana Mary Goyder
May 2, 1871 (Age 38 years)
Cause: Phthisis; Haemoptysis
Burial of a wifeMargaret Diana Mary Goyder
May 6, 1871 (Age 38 years)
Death of a fatherThomas Harvey
November 1, 1885 (Age 52 years)
Death of a brotherThomas Harvey
June 13, 1887 (Age 54 years)
Burial of a brotherThomas Harvey
June 16, 1887 (Age 54 years)
Marriage of a childCharles Thomas Hunt “CharlesHunt-HelmsleyHelmsleyMary Amelia Etherington “May” HarveyView this family
1888 (Age 54 years)

Marriage of a childJohn Martin “JohnMartin-HarveyHarvey SirAngelita Helena Maria de Silva FerroView this family
January 2, 1889 (Age 55 years)
Marriage of a childDavid Gwyder “Gwy” HarveyCynthia Adelaide CashView this family
1890 (Age 56 years)

Death of a half-sisterMary Ann Gowland
February 19, 1895 (Age 62 years)
Burial of a half-sisterMary Ann Gowland
February 25, 1895 (Age 62 years)
Death of a brotherJoseph Martin Harvey
May 27, 1900 (Age 67 years)
Burial of a brotherJoseph Martin Harvey
May 29, 1900 (Age 67 years)
Description
short man!
yes

Christening of a sonJohn Harvey

Death May 5, 1901 (Age 68 years)
Guys Hospital, Southwark, London, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.503309 Longitude: W0.087927

Burial May 6, 1901 (1 day after death)
Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: December 12, 1827Greensted, Essex, England, United Kingdom
1 month
elder brother
Thomas Harvey
Birth: 1827 23 33Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: December 1827Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
16 months
elder brother
Thomas Harvey
Birth: April 29, 1828 24 34Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: June 13, 1887High St, Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
16 months
elder brother
Joseph Martin Harvey
Birth: September 6, 1829 26 36Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: June 7, 1831Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
17 months
elder brother
23 months
himself
21 months
younger brother
2 years
younger sister
Caroline Harvey
Birth: November 15, 1836 33 43Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 8, 1840Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Father’s family with Sophia Griggs - View this family
father
step-mother
Sophia Griggs
Birth: about 1825 32 26Brightlingsea, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: April 15, 1907Prittlewell, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Marriage: November 29, 1863Swedenborgian Church, Essex, England, United Kingdom
14 months
half-brother
Mother’s family with Thomas Gowland - View this family
step-father
mother
Marriage: August 24, 1814St Mary the Virgin, Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
16 months
half-sister
3 years
half-sister
Sarah Gowland
Birth: 1817 28 23Harwich, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: November 26, 1836Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Family with Margaret Diana Mary Goyder - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: April 22, 1857New Christian Church, Argyll Sq, London, England, United Kingdom
23 months
son
John Harvey
Birth: March 8, 1859 26 23Bath St, Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 20, 1859Bath Street, Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
2 years
daughter
Edith Goyder Harvey
Birth: April 4, 1861 28 25Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: November 17, 1865Quay, Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
2 years
son
2 years
daughter
Mary Amelia Etherington “May” Harvey
Birth: August 17, 1865 32 30Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: June 17, 1930Shanklin, Isle of Wight, Hampshire, England, United Kingdom
2 years
son
David Gwyder “Gwy” Harvey
Birth: September 1867 34 32Quay House, Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: March 3, 1919Agnews State Hospital, 4000 Lafayette Road, Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, California, United States of America
19 months
daughter
Florence Anna Harvey
Birth: April 16, 1869 36 33Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 30, 1869Quay, Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
15 months
son
Charles Woodroffe Harvey
Birth: July 18, 1870 37 35Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: July 15, 1952Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America

Shared note

I, Raymond Harvey, the author of this history is a descendant of Robert Harvey and his first wife Susannah Levitt, the daughter of Isaac Levitt, Yoeman, from Tollesbury in Essex. Thomas Harvey the shipbuilder was the son of Robert Harvey'ssecon d wife Susannah Ellingford from Gt. Wigborough, Essex. John Harvey is Thomas Harvey and Mary Elizabeth Martin's fifth but only their third son to survive infancy.

The moral of this history is that you cannot believe everything that has printed by others, much written about John partly taken from books like the very first volume of 'Lloyd's Yachts' which was printed in 1887 (check date) a very trusted firm of insurers whose publications are treated as the 'Holy Grale' for ships and their owners, few are game to question their contents but Lloyds cannot be blamed for information provided by men they trusted like John Harvey, John could have beenp art of the Harvey family buildwes of great yacht, instead, he wanted everything and achieved his goal by claiming the work of his father and brothers, harsh comments indeed but very true, npw read on and you can be the judge.

John Harvey1833-1901, son of Thomas Harvey1803-1805 & Mary Elizabeth Martin 1793-1862 was the fifth child born but only the third son survive infancy. John was born in the Harvey home in the shipyard, and, like most of the greater Harvey family received some education, he may have gone to sea like his brothers but so far I have not found any evidence or a record with any indication of such. John was indentured (what as?, no indentute has ever been found) in 1848 to his father ThomasH arvey at the age of fifteen, in 1851,we find him with his brother Thomas who was in charge of the Halifax Shipbuilding Yard as "Thomas Harvey & Son" in partbership was with his father Thomas senior, also in the 1851 census records for Ipswichwa s their mother Mary Elizabeth (nee Martin) Harvey, she is with her sons and is recorded as being the wife of Thomas Harvey (shipbuilder, not present, employing seventy five men & boys), we do know this is the total of workers at the Halifaxyard, because, on the same 1851 census has a Berkley Harvey Sainty from Wivebhoe working in the Ipswich yard as foreman, living just a few doors door down in Wherstead Road from the Harveys. There was a whole clutch of men and their familiesall from Wivenhoe and East Donyland living in that road and working in the shipyard, 46 men from Wivenhoe alone so the total of seventy five would have been for that yard.

If John was an aprenticed he served most of his time under the stewardship of his elder brother Thomas at Ipswich, certainly not in the Wivenhoe yard. If John had an aprenticship it usually was for a period of seven years, John would havegradu ated in 1855. Something happened at the Ipswich yard some time after that, what exactly, we do not know, John appears to have worked in the office, not having a liking for yard work, could it have been as a fully fledged shipbuilder hewant a s hare in the business? or, was it a personal cobflict os something to do with the yard, perhaps we will never know. There certainly was a falling out between the two brothers.

While at Ipswich John met and courted the very beautiful Margaret Diana Mary Goyder (1835-1871) the daughter of a Swedenborgian Cleric, the Very Reverend Dr. David George Goyder (1796-1878), part of this family had a serious problem with TB,i ncluding Margaret Diana, despite this fact John and Margaret Diana Goyder were married at a society wedding in London on the 22 April 1857 in the 'New Christian Church' at Argyle Stree, John's ocupation was listed as shipbuildert.

There are stories of John joining the 'Harwich Yacht Club', in 1845, I found a John Harvey recorded in the book 'The Yachting Season of 1845', John was just twelve then, so it is totally unlikely that it was him, besides he would never beennomin ated and certainly not allowed to join the elete 'Harwich Yacht Club' at that tender age. The Essex Standard reports Thomas Harvey as being a member of the 'Harwich Yacht Club' in 1845, there is no mention of Thomas being a member atHarwich in the same book 'The Yachting Season of 1845' so we must presume it was a misprint. John Harvey also states that he joined the firm (mentioned at the bankrupt hearing of John & Thomas Harvey junior in 1873, John stated then that hehad never bee n in partnership with his father) in 1857 at Wivenhoe, we now know he worked in the office and kept the books.

John set up house with his bride in Bath Street at the shipyard where their first son John Harvey (1859-1859) born on the 6 March and died on the 20 December the same year. Sarah (nee Etherington) Goyder (1794-1886) Margaret Diana's mother wasv isiting when their second child Edith Goyder Harvey (1861-1865) was born on the 4 April, Edith died aged four on the 17 November 1865.

After Mr Brummel'[s widow died and Wivenhoe House was dismantled around1861, the land belonging to the House was split into parcels for sale, Thomas senior purchased a parcle of twenty acres of this parkland and broke it into small allotments,it is not known if he built any houses on these blocks but it certainly helped Wivenhoe develop northwards beyond the railway line, there is little doubt that he profited from this ventureso there was little chance of Thomas senior goinginsolvert as John had stated at the bankrupt hearing in 1873.

George Pryer (1837-1880) a draftsman joined the shipyard on or before1860, on the 1861 census George was lodging in John's home at Bath Street, then part of the shipyard complex and next door to the home of Thomas senior. There is a claim which I don't believe that John Harvey designed and built almost all of the yachts ever built in all of the Harvey yards, these were published as being built by him (there is little douby this information was supplied by John himself) in the firsteve r publication of Llotd's Yachts. The records of all ofSainty's boats, the Wivenhoe and the Ipswich built boats including their design and plans were suposably destroyrd in the shipyard fire of 1872. How could John describe each yacht in detail i for every yacht ever built in the Harvey shipyards as his own work without still having the original plans or records. We know Thomas senior built many yachts as far back as 1845 but not one is credited to him that I could find, oneor two ya cht are credited to Thomas Harvey junior and that is all, John had good motive for doing this, it was to promote himself as a great designer of yachts which he eventually achieved. John could have achieved the same position underhis own right .

In 1863 their third child, John Martin (1863-1944 later to become Sir John) was born on the 22 July 1833, always refered to as Martin by his family and friends, lived with his father after the death of his mother in Quay Hpuse, his autobiography differs a little from the truth but at the age of sixty nine years the finer detail of his youth would be a little off as not very much of his life was spent there.Sir John's family tree is another matter, it drifts away from his marinerbackgro und into a relm of fanticy not becoming a Knight of the Relm. John's true background is very different indeed and hides a secrets that a Knight would not be proud to admit.

When owners placed orders for new yachts with the shipyards the owners would have expressed their desire and knew exactly what they wanted because they were investing in a lot of prestige besides paying out a great deal of money, perhaps afloor plan with most dementions in size and shape, George Prior would have done all the final drawings and Thomas senior, and later John would have presented them to the owners for final approval. Thomas would have had a large say in all theyacht des igns and cost, at least up until 1864. Sir John states his father took over management of the yard in 1865, the exact time of the name change. George Prior was to marry Thomas Harvey's niece, Laura Harvey in 1863, this George willplay a vital part in the persuing drama of John and the Wivenhoe shipyard.

In the1861 census Mary Elizabeth (nee Martin) Harvey, apparently not well, was staying with her son Joseph, his occupation is recorded as shipbuilder ( Wivenhoe yard), living in Rose Cottage ( Rose Cottage must have had an enduring effect on the Harvey family) on the hill next to the old windmill at the end of what was then known as Mill Road, not very far from Rectory House, there was corn (wheat) growing in the fields opposite the mill that producing the grain that feed themillstones that ground the grain into flower. This open area was considered a very healthy place with clean air well away from the smell and the blood that drained into the river from the slaughter house in Blood Ally (Blyth Street), thedecaying fish lef t on the quay and the noise of the hammers and saws of the shipyards. John was to bring his wife here to expose her tp the cleaner air and Joseph moved down to 'The Shipwrite Alms"

Note;- Rose Cottage must have had an enduring effect on the Harvey family, Thomas Harvey senior named his house in Brightlingsea 'Rose Cottage', My grandfather Jonathan Harvey who left Wivenhoe in 1861 to go to the goldfields in Victoria,Austral ia called his property at Wallumbilla 'Rose Farm', in fact that was his postal address no matter on which one of his propereties he was residing on at that time, perhaps a little nostalga memories from home.

Mary Elizabeth was the driving force behind Thomas and the shipyards until she died in 1862, aged 69, from that point on Thomas Harvey appeared to have lost interest in the every day running of the yard though still building great boats thusgiv eing his son John, the man in the office the opertunity to promote himself as being in controle. After Thomas and Thomas junior (Thomas Harvey's eldest son (1828-1887), who was in partnership with with his father known as 'Thomas Harvey andSon' ) closed the Halifax Shipyard in Ipswich in 1864, Thomas junior returned to the yard in Wivenhoe, Thomas senior retired after building 'Thought' and finishing his commitments to others and left the yard in the hands of his three sons,Thomas ju nior, his previous partner, John and Joseph Harvey. Edward Harvey had gone to sea and was no longer followed the shipbuilding trade. Thomas moved to Brightlingsea with his new wife Sophia Greggs ( 1825-1907) in time for the birth oftheir only child Fred, Sophia was also born there and Brightlingsea was the home of Thomas Harveys ancestors.

When Thomas senior left John Harvey changed the name of the Wivenhoe Yard in 1865 to John 'Harvey & Company', there is no early objection at first but that was to come later.

John died at JMH's home - 30 Avenue Road, St Johns Wood, London on the 5 May 1901, Probate value of two hundred pounds.

William P. Stephens Collection Index to Personal Names NOTE: The fraction(s) indicate the Box and Folder numbers where that particular reference can be found. For example, the researcher will find information about Ackers, George H. in Box 7, Folder 15 of the collection Harvey, J. 11/1, 11/9 Harvey, John 2/27, 3/9, 3/21, 5/4, 5/9, 6/26, 8/22 1841 census JOHN HARVEY 8 Lexden & Winstree 1851 census JOHN HARVEY 18 Ipswich, St Matthew Piece: 1689; Folio: 21; Page: 35, Schedule 218, are Maria Pittuck (housekeeper), Marianne Bailey (governess) and Rosa Fairs (servant). The house is next door to the Rose and Crown.

We know John and Diana Harvey were in Plymouth, and we know the children were in Penzance. I strongly suspect that schedule 218 represents the rest of their staff left at home in Wivenhoe. 1861 census, John Harvey, ship builder (as was his father Thomas & brothers 1881 census Dwelling: The Quay Census Place: Wivenhoe, Essex, England Source: FHL Film 1341433 PRO Ref RG11 Piece 1794 Folio 12 Page 17 George Coghlan WATSON M 39 M Chelmsford, Essex, England Head Civil Engineer Mary WATSON M 29 F Tring, Hertford, England Wife Occ: Wife Of Civil Engineer Thomas A.Bray WATSON 6 M Tring, Hertford, England Rel:Son: Scholar Ethelwyn Mary WATSON 3 F Tring, Hertford, England Rel: Daur Clara Charlotte COOK U 29 F Islington, Middlesex, England Rel: Visitor Occ:Nil Ann BLUNT U 37 F Chesham, Buckingham, England Servt Domestic Servant John HARVEY W 47 M Wivenhoe, Essex, England Visitor : Naval Architect Emelie PEALING U 29 F Reygate, Surrey, England Boarder: Clerit Commercial Thomas James FALL U 22 M Langenhoe, Essex, England Serv : Groom 1882 SNARLEYOW, designed by John Harvey, and built by John C. Smith in New York > City in 1882, First Name: John Harvey Ethnicity: USA Naval Arthetic Last Place of Residence: Date of Arrival: August 05, 1893 Age at Arrival: 60y Gender: M Marital Status:
Ship of Travel: New York Port of Departure: Southampton, England Manifest Line Number: 0195, 6 pieces of baggagr

Hello John, Sainty was the builder of both Pearls'. The Harvey story is very long and complicated, most of what is written about the Harveys is not correct. This ia a brief (true) history of the yard. Thomas Harvey (a carpenter) married Mary ElizabethMar tin in Dec. 1827, Mary was then a widow. I firmly believe it was mostly her money that purchased the Sainty yard. Mary Elizabeth Martin's father dies in 1831. 1831, Thomas works on his step brothers Robert Harvey's boat, Thomas thenbuilds his first ship jointly owned by himself and Mary's brother-in-law Isaac Blyth (more Martin money). Sainty's yard purchased 1832/3. In 1849 the Ipswich yard was purchased and the firm became Thomas Harvey and Son. This son was Thomasjunior(not Jo hn as books say because, among other things John was then only 16 years of age). Thomas Harvey sen. stayed in Wivenhoe but his wife Mary Elizabeth went to Ipswich with Thomas junior, again I believe that she was the driving forcebehind the new Ipswich investment. UPDATE 8Jun03: Bill Ellis has been to see the vessel and completed some research as follows: The Volante is a cutter built by Harvey & Coy of Wivenhoe in 1870 (Official number 87289) with sails by Madder. Her dimensions are length: 37' x breadth 10.5' and draught 5.3'. 16 Tons (Thames Measure). In 1886 the yacht was owned by Mr W.F. Cook of St Pauls Churchyard, London. Possibly the vessel was built for him. Note: Stephanie Fearn believes her uncle bought 'Volante' from a Mr Cook in 1953 - perhaps the same family as the 1886 owner.

Be very careful of the feats of John Harvey. John is given the credit for much that was built by his brother Thomas junior. John joins the firm in 1857. Mary Elizabeth dies 1862. Ipswich yard closes in 1864. Thomas Harvey sen. walks out of the shipyard leaving his three sons in charge. John takes full controle but Thomas jun. take John to court and in 1870 Thomas jun. wins. 1872. Shipyard burns, books, plans and most of the yard destroyed. firm bankrupt. John Harvey finallyachi eved his goal of taking over the business in 1873. John Harvey went into partnership with Pryer (draftsman for the firm and prime suspect of the fire) "Harvey & Prior" (as this was painted on the side of the ship yard). Prior died in1880. John Harvey again bankrupt and retired.

I, Raymond Harvey am a descendant of Robert Harvey and his first wife Susannah Levitt, the daughter of Isaac Levitt, Yoeman, from Tollesbury in Essex. Thomas Harvey the shipbuilder was the son of Robert Harvey's second wife Susannah Ellingfordf rom Gt. Wigborough, Essex. John Harvey is Thomas Harvey'sAs you can see I am very interested in the family as a whole.

Ray Harvey.

From: "Rivercot" Rivercot@eclipse.co.uk

Subject: Re: Pearl Date: 22/04/2003 16:34:55 To: "Raymond Harvey" rharvey@powerup.com.au

Well done, Ray; that extract is very interesting. Do you know when Harvey's Yard started and which of your ancesters ran it over the years ? Why is Sainty called the builder, when I thought that he was the designer ? This correspondence is very good ! Yours, John ----- Original Message ----- From: Raymond Harvey To: Rivercot Sent: Monday, April 21, 2003 10:20 AM Subject: Pearl

John, No word from Chris Goddard as yet. I have scanned this from Nicholas Butlers book for you;-

The Marquis of Anglesey was so pleased with Pearl that he kept her for thirty-one years and even persuaded the Royal Navy to build a man-of-war to the same design. The sloop-of-war Pearl, last of the big naval warships to be built atWivenho e, was designed and constructed by Sainty. She was 558 tons, carried eighteen guns and with a draught of 15' 8" it is not surprising that her launch was attended with difficulty. She was due to enter the water on 3rd March, 1828, butSainty obser ved that the earth beneath the cradle which was to guide her down the slipway was beginning to move, and to prevent a disaster that might have claimed the lives of the two hundred people aboard her, postponed the launch for afortnight.6 On 17th March she was duly launched, amid general acclamation, and went to Woolwich for fitting out. However, unlike her civilian namesake, this Pearl was not a success. Neither the Saintys, Philip and Mosely, nor the Navy, were pleasedwit h her. In the course of a peaceful career which took her to Lisbon, the West Indies and South America, she captured a Spanish slaver. For two years she was commanded by Lord Clarence Paget, one of the Marquis of Anglesey's sons. She wasbroken up in 1851. In 1829, Sainty produced a snow, (a small sailing vessel with two masts), of 202 tons, Cupid, in 1830 a cutter yacht, Water Witch, for Sir Thomas Ormsby, General Rebow's first son-in-law, in 1831 a three-masted barque of 196 tons, theWilliam and Mary, for William Hawkins, and in 1833 a brigantine of 105 tons, Fancy Lass.8

Ray.

1851 census @ St Marys Stoke with Thomas, Ipswich. Met Margaret D.M Goyder abt 1855 in Ipswich married in 1857 His son (Sir John) said his father joined the firm in 1857. 1862 Thomas Harvey's wife dies. Ipswich closes abt 1864. 1865 Thomas retires & John manager of firm. John takes over and was in court in 1870 when brother Thomas regains partnership of firm. Oct 1872 fire destroys yard. Firm bankrupt. 1873Joh n regains controle of firm. Children- John Martin (Sir John) mar A.H.M.De Silver, May, Gwdir, Charles W. 1881 census 47 years a Naval Architec visiting George C Watson @ Wivenhoe

    John Harvey: The 1872 Shipyard Fire  From: The Autobiography of Sir John Martin-Harvey1933 (you will note that Sir John Martin-Harvey was quite oblivious of the fact that Thomas Harvey junior was then half owner of the shipyard, there is nomen tion of this Thomas).   My father and mother at the time of my birth lived in a house enclosed within the shipyard itself, the greater part of which was destroyed by fire in 1872. My father was then executing some work on a vessel for theGovernm ent and, when the fire broke out, its gutted hull stood, with all interior fittings removed, in such a position that she could not be launched. My father was in London at the time and his brother, Joseph(another son of Thomas, theshipbuilder.  J oseph then worked in the yard as a shipwright, Joseph also lived and operated an Inn nearby) , who always took charge in my father's absence, had the presence of mind to lay on a hose-pipe and fill her with water pumped from theriver. This saved  the vessel, though the water actually boiled in the hull before the fire had spent its fury. Large lumps of molten glass, with copper bolts, screws and what-not embedded in them, stood in our house for long afterwards asmementos of the catastro phe. A catastrophe it was; for, though the shipyard was more substantially and conveniently rebuilt, the old order never returned.  From: Essex County Standard, 30 August 1872  Wyvenhoe Extensive conflagration During theearly hours of Sunday mor ning this little town was the scene of one of the most disastrous conflagrations which has taken place in this neighbourhood for many years. It appears that on the 22nd inst a new yacht - the Softwing - built at MessrsHarvey's Yard was launched  and on Saturday the owner of that vessel, Mr Courtauld, gave a dinner to the workmen about 80 in number. The party took place in the middle floor of the building situated at the north-east corner of the Yard and whichconsists of nail warehouse  below the floor in question used for laying out ship lines and drawing office and a screw loft above;. The premises were clear of the men at 10 o'clock and when Mr George Pryer, draftsman to the firm, looked round at11 previously to retiring al l was safe. A few minutes before 12, Mrs Joseph Harvey, who resides at the Beer House at the opposite corner of the entrance to the Yard, saw that a fire had broken out in the loft in questions. Her husband not beingat home she at once ran to th e house of the barman, Burr, residing near the Church, but meanwhile the flames had been seen by Mr Joseph Harvey himself who was walking on the quay with Police Sergt Hewitt and they with others hastened to thespot. A mounted messenger was imme diately despatched to Colchester for the engines of the Essex and Suffolk Equitable Insurance Society and when he arrived he found most of the Brigade assembled as the fire had been seen and the men alarmed.Horses having been procured, an engine  was soon on its way thither , and a second speedily followed. The fire was also seen at Colchester Camp and the men were aroused and kept on duty for some time, but as they received no intimation of itswhereabouts, they did not proceed thither.  In the meantime the whole of Wyvenhoe and district had been aroused, and every effort was made to arrest the progress of the devouring element, which was rapidly gaining ground. The man first on thespot had attempted to get out the small fire e ngine which is kept on the premises and which, before now, has done good service at other fires in the village, but before it could be moved to where it could worked, it had become surrounded by thespreading flames and ha to be abandoned, and it  shared the fate of the other property in the yard. The first engine from Colchester arrived about on o'clock, when the fire had got to a great height, It being low tide, the suction pipe was tooshort to reach the water in the river, and it was  at last found necessary to place the engine on the ferry hard, which, being a long distance off, rendered the pumping much more difficult. The second engine was also set to work as soon as itarrived, but it was five o'clock in the morning befor e the flames were subdued, and the engines were kept at work though the whole of Sunday. The property destroyed includes a new blacksmith's shop and boat-building shop (not insured), all thebuilding sheds but one; the warehouse, containing valua ble veneers, fancy woods, and a large quantity of valuable brass and copper work; office, containing drawing, records, and designs which cannot be replaced; workmen's shops, with toolsvalued at a considerable sum; the works of the patent slip, t he massive iron wheels of which were at one time red hot; mouldings and moulding shop; blocks and blockhouse; the house of MR. J. Harvey (the Mariners public-house). insured; thehouse of Mr. T. Harvey, not insured; several workshops; the residen ces of Mrs. Patrick, widow; Harrell, yachtsman; Oakley, fisherman (whose dead child was removed to Mrs. Turner's), all next the yard. On the other side of the road, the cottagesdestroyed were those occupied by Mr. Wm. Barr (who is also owner); J ohn Bartlett, Mrs. Woodward, Mrs. Turpin, and Mrs. Rodgers. The cottage occupied by Lummis, Oakley, and Cole were each cleared out, but fortunately the fire did not reach them.The latter rented cottages and all the row belong to Mr. P. Havens; t he rest, with the exception of Barr's cottage, belong to Messrs. Harvey, all being copyhold. It was be seen, be a communication given below, that Messrs. Harvey are insured tothe extent of £3,400 in the Phoenix Office, but this will not nearly c over their loss. Four of the cottages were insured in the General Fire Office. The Independent Meeting House had a most narrow escape as its west side was somewhat injured.The west side of the Ship Yard was also saved by individual efforts. Earl y in the progress of the fire, Messrs. Harvey's men launched, in a most unceremonious manner, the smack Aurora, which was on the patent slip for repairs. Next to this wasthe screw-steam yacht Idler, the property of Mr. A. B. Cook, of London, and  Mr. Pryer, assisted by the vessel's captain (Mr. Sanson), set about saving it from destruction. So well did they work that hey succeeded, although the blocks whichsupported it on the slip were often alight and much charred. Thus, not only were  these two vessels (the latter valued at £600) saved, but another large yacht was preserved. Five rowing boats were also saved. When one of them was being let down,a spaul gave way, and the boat fell upon the platform, and a half-a-dozen men wit h it. One man, named Thomas Harris, was slightly injured. In endeavouring to rescue some property form one of the burning house, a seaman (a stranger) on board theschooner Thomas, now lying at Wyvenhoe, was so seriously burnt that his removal to  the Essex and Colchester Hospital was found necessary. During the progress of the fire some roughs succeeded in getting hold of a cask of beer, rescued from theMariners public-house, and the head having been knocked in, some drunkenness ensued.  The scene of the conflagration was visited by many hundred of people during Sunday and Monday, and much sympathy is felt in the neighbourhood for the sufferersby the disaster,. It will be seen by an announcement in a letter below that a subscri ption has been entered into, with a view of assisting the workmen to buy new tools, and assisting those who lost their furniture, and we understand that it hasreceived liberal support from several well known resident in the districts. £100, we b elieve, is required to be raised. 

John Harvey: The 1873 Shipyard Fire  From: Essex County Standard, 29th January 1873  Wyvenhoe Bankruptcy of Messrs. John and Thomas Harvey, Jun. The adjourned Public Examination Sitting of these bankrupts, well-known firm of yacht builders ofWy venhoe, was held at the Town Hall, Colchester, on Monday, before Mr. J. S. BARNES, Registrar. The Sitting was to have been held a week earlier, but in consequence of the unfortunate accident to the Registrar while hunting with the East EssexHoun ds, it had to be postponed until Monday. Although still suffering from the effects of the accident, we were glad to find that Mr. Barnes was able to attend, and that during the sitting he was congratulated upon his convalescence, acongratulation  in which we heartily join. Mr. SAYERS TURNER appeared for the Trustee (Mr. E. J. Craske) and the Committee of Inspection; Mr H. JONES for the Bankrupt, Mr. Thomas Harvey; and Mr. F. B. PHILBRICK for Mr. John Harvey; Mr HORACEPHILBRICK was for s everal creditors; and Mr. TITCHMARHS, of Ipswich, attended as Trustee of Cuthbert's (a creditor) estate. Mr John Harvey, who has been the managing member for the firm, and who kept the accounts, was examined at very greatlength. In reply to ques tions by Mr. TURNER, he stated that he was not originally in partnership with his father, but when the latter came to grief, he (the Bankrupt) was set going by Mr. W. W. Hawkins, and his brother subsequently came in as apartner. His brother had  claimed to be a partner, and had filed a bid in Chancery, and he (John) gave way, and admitted him as a partner. He had no capital to start without Mr. Hawkins made an agreement which satisfied the then creditors, andhis (Mr. Hawkin's) credit t he new firm was supplied with everything necessary to carry on the trade. People advanced money as soon as he began to carry on the business. It was the custom in yacht building for people to make advances as soon asthe firm began, and even befo re - in fact a man did not want any capital to commence yacht building if had got a good name. His brother Thomas did not bring two pence into the business, although he promised to do so. There were not many baddebts made in the business, but fr om 1870, when his brother was with him in full swing as a partner, he could not tell what their annual profits were. In 1870, at the time of the Chancery Suit, Mr. Jay was engaged to make a valuation, whichshowed that the stock alone was worth a bout £2,300. He believe that an old vessel (the Sinbad) was included in this valuation. The profits of the business ought to have been £1,500 a year, considering the work they had had the last three years.Tolerably conducted, and even extravagan tly, it would produce that. There was only one banking account kept. This was kept at the bank of Messrs. Bawtree, and Co., was in the name of "John Harvey and Co.". Up to the time of the partnership, healone wrote cheques, but since 1870 his br other had also written them, although he tried to stop him. Thomas did not pay any of the tradesmen. The arrangement was that he (witness) should see after the books, and that Thomas should look afterthe yard. He was not satisfied with the amoun ts Thomas drew - he thought he drew too much. Mr. TURNER. What did he draw per year? Witness. Something like £230 in six or seven months. Mr. TURNER. What amount did you draw? Witness said he drew acheque every week to cover wages and travelling  expense; and his housekeeper used to draw from the cashier what was required to keep the house, and this was entered in the Petty Cash Book. He had averaged his travelling expenses at £4 per week.In the course of further examination witness exp lained the manner in which, since the first sitting, he had made up a posthumous cash-book to supply the place of the cash-book which he alleged was burnt at the late fire in the shipyard, and heexpressed his belief that it was correct with £50.  He was then questioned as to the ownership of the Post Office Property at Wyvenhoe, which he said he believed cost him £300. He said that Mr. Chapman found the bricks and the firm "Harvey andCo," found the carpenter's labour which would amount  to about £34. The firm also received all the rents from this property; but nevertheless the property did not belong to the firm but to his private estate. He knew he had acted foolishly inallowing the firm to receive the rents but it was done i n order to keep the firm going. The property was mortgaged for £350, but this the firm paid off, although not until it had received £700 or £800 for rent. His sister, Mrs. Morgan, ofBarking, had a mortgage on a vessel the Perseverance, belonging  to a person named Scott. This vessel was sold, but did not fetch the amount of the mortgage, and his sister let him have it. He was to secure this sister her money. He promised topay her or secure her by mortgage in the vessel but he did not do  so; he sold it, and afterwards secured his sister by a mortgage in a smack called the "Who'd a Thought IT". He executed this mortgage on the 17th Sept. 1872, but had promised todo it long before, in proof of which a letter, dated May, 1871, fro m him to his sister was produced. Mr. TURNER said a letter written on May, 1871, would wipe out what he called a fraudulent preference in September, 19872. Mr. F.B. PHILBRICKconsidered that the letter went to show that there had not been a fraud ulent preference. Mr. John Harvey further stated that just before the Bankruptcy Mr. John Brown, of Magdalen Street, had some old iron of him, and was credited with theamount. This was in the ordinary way of trade. He did not know of his insolve ncy until the cheque of Mr. W. Browne, ropemaker, Wyvenhoe, was dishonoured. He informed his bankers that he was insolvent and that they must not pay any more cheques.His brother-in-law, Dr. Goyder, held a policy on his life for £200. He attribu ted to the recent fire, in a great measure, the cause of their failure. They had had a great deal of business of late, and their stock had much increased, so that atthe time of the fire they were not nearly sufficiently insure., The amount of th e insurance , £1,357 was paid into the Bank when received. Mr. TURNER. Have you any idea of the cause of the fire? Witness believed the premises were set fire topurposely by some one. There had been a treat given to the men there that night, and  as usual great watch was afterwards kept for some item to see if everything was all right. IT was almost impossible that the fire could have occurredaccidentally, but of course this was merely his individual opinion. In reply to Mr. TITCHMARSH,  he said he still adhere to his former statement , that the cash-book ha d been destroyed at the fire; he had given the Trustee an account of all thereceived for inspecting other people's yachts; what he received from this source always went int o the business, and it appeared on the books; he did not know before the fire that the firm was insolvent; he would swear that he did notcontemplate it. Mr. TITCHMARSH then questioned the witness on the accounts, evidently with a view to show th at the posthumous cash-book had not been made up in the way described, but nothing of any importance was elicited. Mr. H. PHILBRICK (towitness). Have you seen the cash-book in question, and the papers that were in ti, since the fire? Witness. I  have not. By Mr. JONES. The "Yankee" belongs to Lord Alfred Paget, but was lent to the firm for us; the firm found her a new set ofsails last year, because the firm used her. Mr. Thomas Harvey. I never used her. Witness. No; because you always  misused her, and were not allowed. Mr. T. Harvey. Then how could it be the firm? Mr. JONES asked for particulars as to his(witness's) father's claim for £208. Mr. CRASKE (Trustee) said the account had been rendered, with dates and items. Witnes s, in answer to Mr. JONES, denied that he had a banking account in London, and that the Post-Office property ever belongedto his father. Mr. F. B. PHILBRICK (after shortly re-examining the witness) submitted that his client was entit led to pass his examination remarking that he (Mr. John Harvey) had made out the best account he could, and that nothing would begained by a further adjournment. Although in cases of this kind there was generally some irregularity in keeping the  accounts, it was no reason why the bankrupt should not pass his last examination. Mr. TURNER, on behalf of the Trustees and thelargest creditors, said he was not instructed to oppose the Bankrupts' passing their last examination, but thought it  must be apparent that there had been the grossest irregularity in the keeping of the accounts, which had been admitted on theother side. Mr. F. B. PHILBRICK. No; I did not make use of the word "gross". Mr. TURNER said he would not withdraw the  word; and after some further observations as to the unsatisfactory way in which the accounts had been kept, he said that thelatter would be further investigated by the Committee of Inspection, who would also enquire into the question of prefere nce. The REGISTRAR said he had no hesitation in allowing the bankrupts to pass, unless there was some solid objection tosuch a course, because in allowing them to pass, the Committee, or any creditor, was not precluded from calling a further mee ting for investigating the affairs of the bankrupts. The object of the first adjournment was that the affair being aheavy one, he thought it would be hard on the creditors if they had not some sort of cash account before them. Mr. Turner had exp ressed his surprise at the way the accounts were kept, but when he had had the experience which he (the Registrar)had in these matters, he would never be surprised to find that people came to the Court without any accounts at all. He was sorry t o say that his experience was that he had never had a bankruptcy case before him in which what he might term aregular debtor and creditor account had been kept; and until the law was altered that could never hope that accounts would be kept by t raders as they ought to be. Mr. JONES. It is suggested that where accounts are so kept they never becomebankrupts. (Laughter.) The REGISTRAR said it was really necessary that there should be Legislative enactment by which no bankrupt would be en titled to his discharge for a number of years who had not kept a proper debtor and creditor account.Mr, H. PHILBRICK. I hope there will not be a perfect account, or there will be no work for us. (Laughter.) Mr. F. B. PHILBRICK. It is said that t he only people who properly keep accounts are the layers. (Renewed laughter.) Mr. J. Harvey. Ithink it is forgotten there was a fire. I will guarantee that my accounts were properly kept. The bankrupts were then declared to have passed their pub lic examination. Mr. JONES, on behalf of himself and his professional brethren, offered tothe Registrar their sincere congratulations at seeing him again at his post. They were all very much pained when they heard of his recent accident, and the y were now extremely glad to find he had so far recovered. The REGISTRAR expresses thisthanks for the kind congratulations, an added that he still felt the effects of the accident. Mr. W. Browne, Wyvenhoe, on behalf of the non-professionals pres ent, joined in the congratulations. The REGISTRAR said he was very sorry that he hadhad to postpone the last sitting. Mr JONES. Pray don't think anything of that for a moment. The proceedings then ended.  The end of the story... From: Essex Coun ty Standard, 2 May 1873  Wyvenhoe We are glad to learn that this rising littleplace is recovering from the effects of the late fire at the Shipyard &c, and the consequent stoppage of a large amount of business; and now (writes our Correspondent) , from yacht building, yacht repairing, and yachts being fitted out, we havevery few idlers.

Occasionally Lloyd's Register's (LR) Rules had been consulted but there was a reluctance to use the Rules as yachtbuilders tended to believe the requirements concerned merchant vessels only. In 1876, John Harvey, a Wivenhoe yachtbuildersuggested that Rules for the construction of yachts should be published by Lloyd's Register.

John met Margaret Goyder when her father was minister in Ipswich. David Goyder went over to Wivenhoe and preached, and the Swedenborgian Church started from there. In that respect it's a very different situation from Brightlingsea and St Osythw here it all got going in the 1810s. According to N Butler, David was actually living in Bath Street at the time of the 1861? census, but I can only find Sarah Goyder listed in the index I have (and she? was probably on a trip back "home" fromAus tralia). I do know that David? left Ipswich in 1871 and moved to live near or with his son David in? Bradford, Yorkshire just after Margaret's death. I've got a cutting about? that which I'll put on the Web.? ? So what I now need to do findout h ow John Harvey got involved with the New? Church sufficiently to marry the minister's daughter. Given that his father? didn't join the Church himself, but did marry someone from a New Church? family. David Goyder's autobiography goes up to1857, which will cover the? time when John and Margaret married, so it's possible that I'll find an? explanation there.? ?The story in JMH's autobiography about his Goyder line having one father with three wives each having seven sons isunsusbtantiat ed. It seems he mixed up his g-grandfather Edward Goyder with Robert Harvey and arrived at the story.

1871 Census: Harvey's Hotel, George Street, Plymouth

1881 Census: Dwelling: The Quay Census Place: Wivenhoe, Essex, England Source: PRO Ref RG11 Piece 1794 Folio 12 Page 17

John HARVEY W 47 M Wivenhoe, Essex, England Rel: Visitor Occ: Naval Architect

Occupation 1901: Naval architect

Shared note

Records not imported into INDI (individual) Gramps ID I0395:

Line ignored as not understood Line 257899: 2 NOTE Ship Builder Line ignored as not understood Line 257902: 2 NOTE Ship Builder

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