Harvey Family Tree 2018-04-30

James MiersAge: 49 years18341883

Name
James Miers
Given names
James
Surname
Miers
Family with Elizabeth Morris - View this family
himself
wife
Elizabeth Morris
Birth: 15 April 1836 25 21Prospect Place, Radford, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England, United Kingdom
Death: 7 May 1921Glengate, Jondaryan, Queensland, Australia
Marriage: 19 March 1864St Ann's Church, Jondaryan
1 year
son
John James Miers
Birth: 8 March 1865 31 28Jondaryan Stn, Jondaryan, Queensland, Australia
Death: 1936Southbrook, Darling Downs, Queensland, Australia
19 months
son
George Henry Miers
Birth: 27 September 1866 32 30Jondaryan Station, Jondaryan, Queensland, Australia
Death: 16 April 1867Jondaryan Station, Jondaryan, Queensland, Australia
3 years
son
4 years
daughter

Shared note

Hello, I was just checking out your site and noticed that you make reference to James Miers of Jondaryan, his daughter was my G/Grandmother Edith Wilhelmina Miers who married Charles Peter Mackenzie. Write back if you would like to catch up, we may have some info that will be helpful to you Allan & Pauline Mackenzie amack.58@bigpond.net.au Regards Allan & Pauline Mackenzie?148 Kippen St?, Mackay Queensland, Australia 4740? ph 07 4953 0850 1883/C000997 Miers James - - ** born Germany aged 49 years (born 1834) (birth place Altenahr ??ANDENAHR or is it ANDERNACH)

  Katholische Kirche Altenahr (Kr. Ahrweiler) (Main Author)

Tote 1741-1742, 1740-1784 Heiraten 1740-1757, 1776-1777, 1758-1784 Taufen 1740-1798 Heiraten 1784-1798 Tote 1784-1798 FHL INTL Film 849144 Items 1-4 Taufen 1667-1740 Firmungen 1717 Tote 1737-1740 Heiraten 1667-1737 Tote 1703-1737 Tote 1667-1691 Taufen 1784-1904 Heiraten 1784-1884 Tote 1784-1886 Tauf-Index 1784-1849 Tauf-Index 1667-1740 FHL INTL Film 1336838 Heirats-Index 1667-1740 Heirats-Index 1784-1885 FHL INTL Film 1336839 Item 1

  Katholische Kirche Andernach (Kr. Mayen) (Main Author)  (I think I read Church Records)

aufen 1828-1863 Neukommunionen 1843-1863 FHL INTL Film 578089 Heiraten 1864-1908, 1828-1863 Kommunionen 1845-1858 FHL INTL Film 578090 Tote 1828-1901 FHL INTL Film 578091

In the 1850s there was a labour shortage on the pastoral properties of the Darling Downs due to the pastoral workers vanishing to the gold fields. To counter this phenomenon, the squatter aristocracy used German agents to recruit Germanshepher d migrants who were brought out under contract between 1852 and 1855. As the squatter’s properties were unfenced, a Shepherd’s job was to live in isolated areas of the property and protect a flock of sheep from dingoes, aboriginalhunters and ge nerally keep the flock in the boundaries of the station. They proved to be reliable, frugal and sober workers who managed to save sufficient cash out of their wages of 20 to 30 pounds per year (and rations) to enable them topurchase land in th e Sixties. These immigrants were forced to come out not through religious persecution as their South Australian counterparts had done but through agricultural disasters that caused famine and abandonment of uneconomicalland holdings caused by generations of land division. he Initial German settlement on the Darling Downs

The Darling Downs during the 1830s to 1860s was divided into large lease land holdings. These settlers had come out from England, with reserves of capital, and had come to the Darling Downs taking large tracts of land under lease. The richgr asslands of the Downs and the low lease rents gave rise to a rich pastoral aristocracy. They chose to graze rather than till the rich soil. Most of these holdings were self-sufficient in that they maintained tradesmen and workers on thestati on and as such relied very little on the services of the nearby towns of Toowoomba and Warwick. This powerful squatter class held dominance over Queensland’s affairs. In the 1850s there was a labour shortage on the pastoral properties of the Darling Downs due to the pastoral workers vanishing to the gold fields. To counter this phenomenon, the squatter aristocracy used German agents to recruit Germanshepher d migrants who were brought out under contract between 1852 and 1855. As the squatter’s properties were unfenced, a Shepherd’s job was to live in isolated areas of the property and protect a flock of sheep from dingoes, aboriginalhunters and ge nerally keep the flock in the boundaries of the station. They proved to be reliable, frugal and sober workers who managed to save sufficient cash out of their wages of 20 to 30 pounds per year (and rations) to enable them topurchase land in th e Sixties. These immigrants were forced to come out not through religious persecution as their South Australian counterparts had done but through agricultural disasters that caused famine and abandonment of uneconomicalland holdings caused by generations of land division.

The Political Climate on the Darling Downs 1850 –1890

At the time of Queensland’s separation in 1859 there was a challenge to the squatters dominance by the merchants, artisans and professional men who were jealous of the Downs pastoralists pre-eminence, economic success and exploitation. J.D.Lan g and his followers pushed the ideals of the yeoman and these groups pressured the government into legislating the Selection Acts, acts which were designed to break up the large land holdings of the squatters into smaller holdings and makethis l and available to the farmer. As the power in the Government was still held by the squatters, they closed ranks to defend their basic interest, and as such, the initial Selection Acts were framed to advantage the squatter. These Actsallowed p re-emptive selection by the squatter of the choicest of lands and then the subdivision and conversion of leasehold to freehold land. These allotments were offered to other settlers who had the capital to purchase and improve theland. There w as a practice of dummying whereby an entitled person to land, sold that privilege to the squatter and the squatter claimed the land under the entitled’s name thus ensuring that most of the original holding was kept intact. As aresult of the sq uatter’s devious practices sprang a great political movement led principally on the Downs by William H. Groom to defeat the power of the squatter and establish an agrarian society on the Downs. Groom, an ex-convict fromEngland who had served h is time, had come to the Downs in 1856 initially as a storekeeper then hotelier. He became partners in the ‘Toowoomba Chronicle’ one of the Downs newspapers, eventually owning it in his own right later on. This paperwas to serve as Groom’s m outhpiece in his political career which spanned from 1861 to 1901 which included Mayor of Toowoomba, MLA in the Queensland Parliament and the first member to represent the Darling Downs in the new Federal Government. AURORA (not found on board) 1855 Moreton Bay Hamburg .. .. .... BK08 ... ... * See BK08 in the SOURCE section for further information MARBS (MERBZ) (not found on board) 1855 Moreton Bay Hamburg .. .. .... BK08 ... ... * See BK08 in the SOURCE section for further information The "Marbs" was owned by Mr Marbs and built by him in Hamburg in1851/5 2. A maritime reference written in German confirms Captain E.C. Wilder for the voyages from 1854-1861 and the destination for 1854/1855 Moreton Bay via Callao, in Peru. The listing also records the voyage 57/59 to Melbourne, so the"Marbs" appare ntly came to Australia a couple of times. The "Marbs" had a load capacity of 178t and dimensions of 120.6 x 30.6 x 18.10 h. [Ref: Kresse, W.: Hamburger Seeschiffe 1824-1888] emigrated from Bavaria to Queensland on the 'Marbs' which departed 15 November 1854 To emigrate, a person had to seek permission from the authorities. Part of the process involved advertising the intention in the local paper so that debtscoul d be cleared before departure. The Marbs and the Aurora, the first two immigrant ships to arrive at Moreton Bay (Brisbane) direct from Hamburg, brought almost 1000 German settlers, mainly from the Tauber River Valley in southern Germany. Arriving on 22nd March, they weremore than a quarter of the year's total immigration into what is now Queensland. There had been 47 deaths on the ships due to outbreaks of typhus, cholera and measles. Some passengers went to jobs in the Ipswich area, some to the Maryborougharea, an d many went to work in the Toowoomba district. The arrival of these settlers was due to Edward Lord, a storekeeper from Drayton on the Darling Downs, who pioneered the idea of encouraging German migration direct to Moreton Bay, ratherthan throug h the port of Sydney. He had been at a meeting of Darling Downs squatters and businessmen held on 21st July 1851 in the Bull's Head Inn at Drayton. This meeting decided to bring German workers direct to the Moreton Bay (Brisbane),rather than thr ough Sydney. From October 1851 to July 1852 Lord, who had been educated in Germany, advertised in the Moreton Bay Courier, offering to landowners his services as an unofficial immigration agent. Wilhelm Kirchner, the Consul forHamburg and for Pr ussia in Sydney, was not happy about Lord's actions, as he was already the official German immigration agent for New South Wales (which still included Moreton Bay). Edward Lord's 1854 trip to Germany promoting Queensland was amajor factor in the emigration of the passengers of the Marbs and the Aurora.

Bayreuth is a city in Oberfranken (upper Franconia) region of Bavaria with a population in 1956 of 60,500. The first two German immigrant ships to sail from Hamburg direct to Moreton Bay, entered the bay on Wednesday the 21st March 1855. Thesesh ips, the "Aurora" and the "Marbs" (also referred to as the "Merbz"), landed a total of 506 people - described as "fine and able looking people who will, without doubt, form a valuable addition to our labouring population".

Some of the immigrants were taken by steamer, "City of Melbourne" to Wide Bay, where they had been engaged for employers in that area. The steamboat "Swallow" took others directly up the Brisbane River to Ipswich, while the remainder came up the river by the "Palermo" and "Brothers" to the immigration depot at Brisbane, where they "enlivened the town with their glee and choruses, appearing to be highly pleased with the appearance of their new home.

Unfortunately the voyages of both ships were marked with tragedy and disaster. The "Aurora", a barque of 132 tons, left Hamburg on October 20th 1854 under Captain Mign. On entering Moreton Bay, it appears that she mistook the entrance, andcoming in by the south passage went aground on the seaward side of Moreton Island. No casualties occurred and the crew and passengers were safely landed, some on the island and the others on Cleveland Point from where they were transferred totheir var ious destinations. The "Aurora" was not so fortunate - left high and dry on the shore, there was no profitable way of getting her off, so she was stripped of her sails and other salvageable fittings.

The "Merbs", a barque of 178 tons, under Captain Wilder, left Hamburg on November 26th 1854. Sickness struck on the first day out of port and typhus, cholera and measles plagued those on board up until the last twelve days of the voyage. In all4 7 deaths occurred on the voyage - 28 of these were children whose deaths were attributed to measles. This high mortality rate - 2% and complaints of insufficient provisioning led the Health Officer for Brisbane, Dr. William Hobbs, to reportthe m atter to the authorities. His report led to an inquiry into the conditions aboard the ship. Dr. Hobbs was very critical of the insufficiency of clothing and the absence of fresh provisions and basic comforts. He attributed the highmortality to t he lack of these necessities and suggested that unless the system was changed, it could be expected that other ships would suffer similar losses. He pointed out that the character of the vessel had to pay for each adult passenger- alive or dead - but would stand to lose nothing if all the passengers were to die, as he insured each of their lives.

Included in Dr. Hobb's report was the following scale of provisions and food allowance on which the "Marbs" immigrant existed for almost four months. The ship sailed direct - no ports were visited on the voyage from which fresh provision couldha ve been obtained. The weekly menu was thus - Sunday - Half a pound of salt beef, and plum pudding. Monday - Half a pound of salt pork, potatoes and sour cabbage. Tuesday - Half a pound of salt beef, and peas. Wednesday - Two salt herrings peradu lt, potatoes and beans Thursday - Half a pound of beef, rice and treacle Friday - Half a pound of pork, potatoes and peas Saturday - Half a pound barley per adult and plums. The allowance of bread per adult was five pound per week, ofcoffee, 31 pounds amongst the whole passengers. The allowance of butter was one half pound per week per adult, and of sugar a quarter of a pound per week per adult.

Medical comforts for the voyage consisted of - wine (claret) - 80 bottles, Arrowroot - six pounds, sago - forty pounds, Oatmeal - sixty pounds, Vinegar - 4 Hogsheads. There were no supplies of milk for the children, no porter (port), no spirits, no lime juice, no clothing, no soap. Little wonder that on arriving in Brisbane, the immigrants "enlivened the town with their glee" - they were no doubt very pleased to leave the ship.

People: The Blacksmith and the Wheelwright

Little is known of the early life of James Mires.

He was born into a family in Germany in 1834. He was educated and able to read and write. Thought to have been encouraged to come to the Darling Downs by a group of business people eager to attract willing workers from Germany

Left Hamburg `1854 arrived about 1855, at the age approximately 21 years, he immigrated to Australia on an contract or assisted passage. Nothing is known of his movements in Australia until 1859, when he is recorded in the records at RosaliePlai ns station, then owned and managed by William Kent I. (see the Morris letters)

Top left: Station Smithy. Top right: Brands burnt into the door of the smithy. Bottom: Blacksmith tools from the Jondaryan smithy's shed. The shed and some tools date back to James Mires' time at Jondaryan.

On Rosalie Plains, James Mires was employed as a horse driver, operating the large horse-powered pump at the wash pool during that year's shearing season. After the shearing was completed, James Mires was taken on as the station blacksmith'smate.

He was obviously an intelligent man and learned his chosen trade quickly, for in the following year upon the departure of the station blacksmith, he became the station's blacksmith.

In 1863, following the purchase of Jondaryan station by the Kent and Wienholt partnership and the impending sale of Rosalie Plains, James Mires transferred to Jondaryan station. At that time Jondaryan was in need of a blacksmith and William Kent did not want to loose his services with the sale of Rosalie Plains.

Thus began the long and illustrious association of James Mires with Jondaryan station, which only came to an end with his tragic death in 1883.

In 1864 Jondaryan acquired the services of a new wheelwright John Schell.

James Mires quickly formed a working partnership with John Schell and these two intelligent and inventive men were to prove to be of tremendous benefit to Jondaryan over their long association with the station, being able to turn their hands and inventive minds to anything that was required of them.

Jondaryan station although largely rich black soil plains, was poorly watered. Digging wells and excavating dams overcame this problem. Stock could be watered at dams without a problem, but water had to be drawn from the wells to water thestock, a very laborious task with the use of windlass and bucket, some of these wells were hundreds of feet deep.

In the mid 1870s, Charles Williams who was managing Jondaryan at that time, asked James Mires if he could construct a windmill that could pump water up out of these wells.

James Mires set his inventive mind to work and with the help of his friend John Schell, the station wheelwright, the two men set to work on solving the problem.

Construction of a windmill to provide power for the pump presented no problem to them, but the development of a pump that could lift water up out of the wells from such a depth was a different matter and it took a lot of trial and error beforeth ey came up with a design that worked.

The pump was fixed in place at the bottom of the well and powered was provide through a wooden shaft that went through a series of guides fixed in place a various intervals up the well and was connected to the mill crank at the top.

The water was raised via a pipe that James Mires manufactured by rolling sheets of galvanised iron and riveting them together. The first operating mill was set up on Codrington outstation, not far from Bowenville in 1880.

The digging of wells by hand was a long, laborious and costly operation.

The principle of the percussion well-boring operation was developed by the Chinese thousands of years ago, but the mechanical percussion boring rig is a relatively modem development, the first one being made in America in the mid nineteenthcentu ry.

Charles Williams had an illustration of this American rig and asked James to try and construct one for him. This proved to be far less of a problem than the development of the windmill pump and within a year they had developed their firstworking percussion well-boring rig, which went into operation in 1881. This machine was powered by a steam engine.

This extremely productive partnership came to an end in late 1881, when John Schell departed from Jondaryan.

Two years later in 1883, at the age of 49 years, James Mires was to die, when he was drowned in the flooded Oakey Creek.

By a strange coincidence, 14 years earlier in 1869, James Mires had witnessed the death in very similar circumstances, of a close friend and fellow employee John White.

John White had gone across the flooded Oakey Creek to drink at the hotel in Jondaryan Township. A wire had been strung between two trees across the flooded creek and a punt was pulled across the creek using this wire, to transfer people back and forth across the creek.

When John White returned to the creek in the afternoon, James Mires took the punt across to pick him up. On the way back John White, somewhat the worse for the alcohol he had consumed, stood up in the boat tipping it up. It began to take inwater and James Mires lost control of it.

The boat was swept away with White in it, leaving James Mires clinging to the wire and he pulled himself to shore along it. John White in the boat was swept away in the floodwaters until the boat was caught in a treetop and pulled under andWhite was drowned.

Fourteen years on, in 1883, James Mires was returning from having a few drinks in the Jondaryan Pub with the shearers. While trying to cross the bridge over Oakey Creek, he was swept off it by rising floodwaters and drowned. (not correct, RayHar vey but he did drown) This essay was written by John Eggleston, the Jondaryan Woolshed Historical Museum and Park Association's Historical Research Officer.

James Miers, Blacksmith of Jondaryan Station

This story could not be told without the assistance and use of the works of John Eggleston, the Jondaryan Woolshed Historical Museum and Park Association's Historical Research Officer. I give them my thanks.

James Miers/Mirers/Mirer/Myers/Meyer/etc. was born c1834 in Altenahr, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, on the River Ahr in the Eifel Mountains. In 1850s there was a labour shortage on the Darling Downs due to the many workers leaving for the gold fields. To counter this, the squatter used German agents to recruit shepherds who were brought out under contracts of 20 to 30 pounds peryear with rations. The Darling Downs was divided into large leaseholds, these included Rosalie Plains & Jondaryan Stations, these two stations are mentioned in this story. These holdings were self-sufficient, they had tradesmen and workers andrelie d very little on the services of the nearby towns of Toowoomba, Warwick or Dalby. From October 1851 to July 1852 Edward Lord, who had been educated in Germany, advertised in the Moreton Bay Courier, offering to landowners and businesspeople alik e of his services as an unofficial immigration agent, Lord's 1854 trip to Germany was a major factor in the emigration of German workers, James was one of these.

James Miers with his travelling companions left Moreton Bay (Brisbane) on a steamer bound for Ipswich, this was just a pleasure trip before the real journey began. In Ipswich they joined the wagon train on it’s long slow weeks long journey back to the Darling Downs. Little is known of James Mires early movements up until 1858 as we have not found any records. The 1859 records for Rosalie Plains Station (then owned and managed by William Kent) show James being employed as a horsedriv er, operating the large horse-powered pump at the washpool which was used to wash the sheep before shearing. After the sheep washing was completed James worked there as the blacksmith's mate. He was obviously an intelligent man and learnedhis c hosen trade quickly, in the following year he became the station's blacksmith. In 1863, following the purchase of Jondaryan station by the Kent and Wienholt partnership and the impending sale of Rosalie Plains, Jondaryan was in need of ablacksm ith, William Kent did not want to lose the service of James paying him the large sum of one hundred pounds per year so he would go with them to Jondaryan Station.

Elizabeth Morris arrived in Morton Bay with her family in 1862 on the ship Conway of 1143 tons, all fare paying migrants. On landing Elizabeth was billeted in the Normal School in Brisbane with her sister Helen and other young women from theshi p. Her parents, John & Ellen Morris and their youngest children stayed with John's sister Eliza (Morris) and her husband Robert Thrutchley who has both arrived in Australia in 1855, they were then living in Fortitude Valley. Elizabeth wasimmedi ately engaged to work at Rosalie Plains and travelled there with the supply train (bullock wagons). rcame some of this problem, stock could be watered at dams quite easily, but water had to be drawn from the wells to water the stock in other areas, a very laborious task using a windlass and bucket. James had met Elisabeth at Rosalie plainswhe re their courtship began, James at Jondaryan was a lonely man, wishing to continue his romance with Elizabeth, James purchased a fine mare from his employers named “Norah” paying eight pounds for her, a considerable sum in those days, Jamescould now travel to Rosalie Plains and visit his beloved. James Miers & Elizabeth Morris were married in 1864 at St Ann’s Church then situated near the old Jondaryan Homestead, Mary Jane Ramsey, originally from Rosalie Plains was Elizabeth’sbridesma id, Alfred Blinko (the carpenter on Jondaryan) was their best man. Jondaryan Station would have celebrated with a grand party, everyone from miles around would have been invited to share in the couple’s happiness, any excuse for aparty was alwa ys turned into a grand affair. The couple lived in a slab house, near the old homestead which was built of the same vertical slab construction of that period.

Elizabeth’s elder sister Eliza and her husband, William Robinson arrived from England in 1866 to work on Jondaryan station as shepherds, Eliza was present at the birth of Elizabeth’s second son, George. James & Elizabeth had four children, John James Miers 1865-1936, John spent his childhood working on Jondaryan as a Shed Hand during the shearing season, he later became a Blacksmith’s mate working with his father James, and becoming the blacksmith after the tragic death of his father. In 1903 John was the blacksmith at Southbrook, he was registered to vote at Jondaryan on the 8 Nov 1904. In 1906 john was still operating the blacksmith shop at Springbrook and remained there for the rest of his life.

Everyone worked at Jondaryan including the women who were paid even if they just kept the house or hut, if they were shepherds they were expected to help their husbands during lambing. Below is a list of Miers (various spelling) who worked onJ ondaryan Station.

Miers (various spelling), years worked at Jondaryan, position Miers Bella (unknown) I859 - 1859 -Child House Servant Miers Deonie I892b-1906, -Child of John James Miers Edith Wilhelmina I873b-1902m -Child, Hutkeeper, Housekeeper
Lamber, Sheep Washer, Shepherd Miers Elizabeth 1864m-1906d -(Mrs James) wife of blacksmith Miers George Henry 1867b -1867d -Child of James & Elizabeth Miers James 1859 - 1883d -Fencer- Shearer. Horse
Driver, Blacksmith's Mate, Blacksmith
Miers John James 1865b- 1906d -(Son of James)Shed Hand,
{blacksmith's Mate. Blacksmith at Jondaryan Miers George Henry 1866b-1867d Miers Mary M. (unknown) 1891m- 1906 (Mrs. John James.) Hutkeeper
House Servant Cook. Miers Michael (unknown). 1881-1881 Child. Shed Hand.
Miers William Henry 1869b-1883 (Son of James) Child -Shed Hand
Miers William Henry 1925 -1935 Generally Useful - Shearer ?

Marriages of James & Elizabeth Miers relations. Miers John James (son) mar Mary Minnie Carey Miers William Henry (son) (my grandfather) mar. Muriel Gertrude Newton Miers Edith W. M. (daughter) mar. Thomas C. McKenzie, from Canada.
Helen Morris, (sister of Elizabeth) mar. John Cran, the Overseer at Jondaryan, in 1868, they lived near James & Elizabeth Miers.

The Jondaryan’s smithy’s Shed of James Miers and others can still be see at the station, cattle brands are burnt into the door, perhaps by many smithies and their blacksmith tools are still working in the Jondaryan smithy's shed today. The shed itself and some tools date back to James Miers' time.

In 1864 Jondaryan acquired the services of a new wheelwright John Schell, thus began a long and illustrious association of James Miers, John Schell and Jondaryan station, this only came to an end with the tragic death of James in 1883. JamesMie rs quickly formed a working partnership with John Schell and these two intelligent and inventive men were to prove to be of tremendous benefit to Jondaryan over their long association with the station, being able to turn their hands andinventive minds to anything that was required of them.

Jondaryan station although largely rich black soil plains, was poorly watered. Digging wells and excavating dams oveket setup, some wells were hundreds of feet deep.

In the mid 1870s, Charles Williams who was managing Jondaryan at that time, asked James Miers if he could construct a windmill that could pump water up out of these wells. James Miers set his inventive mind to work and with the help of hisfrien d John Schell, the station wheelwright, the two men set to work on solving the problem. Construction of a windmill to provide power for the pump presented no problem to them, but the development of a pump that could lift water up out ofthe well s from such a depth was a different matter and it took a lot of trial and error before they came up with a design that worked. The pump was fixed in place at the bottom of the well and power was provide through a wooden shaft that wentthrough a series of guides fixed in place at various intervals up the well and was connected to the mill crank at the top. The water was raised via a pipe that James Miers manufactured by rolling sheets of galvanised iron and riveting themtogether. The first operating mill was set up on Codrington outstation, not far from Bowenville in 1880.

The digging of wells by hand was a long, laborious and costly operation. The principle of the percussion well-boring operation was developed by the Chinese thousands of years ago, but the mechanical percussion boring rig is a relatively modem development, the first one being made in America in the mid nineteenthcentu ry.

Charles Williams had an illustration of this American rig and asked James to try and construct one for him. This proved to be far less of a problem than the development of the windmill pump and within a year they had developed their firstworking percussion well-boring rig, which went into operation in 1881. This machine was powered by a steam engine.

This extremely productive partnership came to an end in late 1881, when John Schell departed from Jondaryan. Two years later in 1883, at the age of 49 years, James Miers was to die, when he was drowned in the flooded Oakey Creek. By a strangec oincidence, 14 years earlier in 1869, James Mires had witnessed the death in very similar circumstances, of a close friend and fellow employee John White. John White had gone across the flooded Oakey Creek to drink at the hotel in JondaryanTown ship. A wire had been strung between two trees across the flooded creek and a punt was pulled across the creek using this wire, to transfer people back and forth across the creek.
When John White returned to the creek in the afternoon, James Mires took the punt across to pick him up. On the way back John White, somewhat the worse for the alcohol he had consumed, stood up in the boat tipping it up, the boat began to takein water and James Miers lost control of it. The boat was swept away with White in it, leaving James Miers clinging to the wire and he pulled himself to shore along it. John White in the boat was swept away in the floodwaters until the boatwas ca ught in a treetop and pulled under, White was drowned.

Fourteen years on, in 1883, James Mires was returning from having a few drinks in the Jondaryan Pub with the shearers. While trying to cross Oakey Creek he drowned.

Elizabeth stayed on at Jondaryan, operating a fruit and vegetable shop down in the township next to the hotel, living in a house in Duke Street. Elizabeth died in 1921 and she was buried under a pepperina tree near the road in the grounds of StA nn Church, the same church in which James & Elizabeth were married almost sixty years earlier, the church that was once near the homestead had now been moved much closer to the village. Obituary 1921, The death of Mrs Miers removes from Jondaryan one of its very oldest residents, “Granny” Miers as she was known to everyone, was resident of the town before the advent of the iron horse and up to a few years back conducted a fruit business in a shop adjoining the Jondaryan Hotel.

James Miers is buried in the Jondaryan Home-station Private Cemetery with his son George Henry Miers.

Raymond Harvey, 1626 Beenleigh Road, Underwood, 4119, Queensland. E-mail harveyhistory@qldnet.com.au harveyhistory@qldnet.com.au Home page http://www.harveyhistory.info Great grandson of James Miers.