Harvey Family Tree 2018-04-30

Jonathan HarveyAge: 85 years18421928

Name
Jonathan Harvey
Given names
Jonathan
Surname
Harvey
Birth 23 March 1842 45 37
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Christening 1 May 1842 (Age 39 days)
Address: High Street
Birth of a sisterHelen Harvey
February 1844 (Age 22 months)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Birth of a sisterAlice Harvey
February 1844 (Age 22 months)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Christening of a sisterHelen Harvey
25 February 1844 (Age 23 months)
Address: High Street
Christening of a sisterAlice Harvey
25 February 1844 (Age 23 months)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Death of a fatherGeorge Harvey
18 July 1846 (Age 4 years)
Death of a sisterAlice Harvey
17 January 1847 (Age 4 years)
Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.857997 Longitude: E0.965274

Burial of a sisterAlice Harvey
19 January 1847 (Age 4 years)
Death of a maternal grandmotherMaria Tracey
1 January 1859 (Age 16 years)
MarriageEmma WaldronView this family
3 May 1869 (Age 27 years)
Beechworth, Indigo, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.353302 Longitude: E146.687725

Birth of a son
#1
John William Harvey
28 May 1870 (Age 28 years)
Albury Road, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia
Latitude: S35.112369 Longitude: E147.355929

Address: Albury Road
Birth of a daughter
#2
Maria Harvey
8 January 1872 (Age 29 years)
Sebastopol, Ovens District, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S37.585278 Longitude: E143.839444

Birth of a son
#3
Alfred Waldron Harvey
15 November 1873 (Age 31 years)
Eldorado, Woolshed Valley, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.310839 Longitude: E146.516504

Birth of a daughter
#4
Elizabeth Harvey
6 August 1875 (Age 33 years)
Birth of a son
#5
George Henry Harvey
9 August 1877 (Age 35 years)
Eldorado, Woolshed Valley, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.310839 Longitude: E146.516504

Death of a sonGeorge Henry Harvey
18 February 1878 (Age 35 years)
Eldorado, Woolshed Valley, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.310839 Longitude: E146.516504

Burial of a sonGeorge Henry Harvey
February 1878 (Age 35 years)
Eldorado, Woolshed Valley, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.310839 Longitude: E146.516504

Birth of a daughter
#6
Sarah Harvey
11 November 1878 (Age 36 years)
Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.15 Longitude: E146.6

Death of a motherMaria Halls
23 September 1879 (Age 37 years)
Birth of a daughter
#7
Jane Helen Harvey
5 September 1880 (Age 38 years)
Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.15 Longitude: E146.6

Birth of a daughter
#8
Caroline Dowcett Harvey
14 August 1882 (Age 40 years)
Birth of a son
#9
Joseph Waldron Harvey
27 February 1884 (Age 41 years)
Death of a daughterSarah Harvey
24 March 1885 (Age 43 years)
Burial of a daughterSarah Harvey
24 March 1885 (Age 43 years)
Death of a brotherStephen George Halls Harvey
22 March 1886 (Age 43 years)
Burial of a brotherStephen George Halls Harvey
29 March 1886 (Age 44 years)
Birth of a daughter
#10
Emma Mary Susan A Harvey
8 August 1886 (Age 44 years)
Yuleba, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.61393 Longitude: E149.37988

Birth of a daughter
#11
Harriet Hannah Harvey
18 October 1889 (Age 47 years)
Birth of a son
#12
Edward Benjamin Waldron Harvey
1 April 1892 (Age 50 years)
Stephenson Street, Yuleba, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.612986 Longitude: E149.381692

Address: Stephenson Street
Birth of a son
#13
Richard Harvey
1 August 1894 (Age 52 years)
Stephenson Street, Yuleba, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.612986 Longitude: E149.381692

Address: Stephenson Street
Christening of a sonRichard Harvey
1894 (Age 51 years)
Yuleba, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.61393 Longitude: E149.37988

Death of a sisterSusannah Harvey
after 1901 (Age 58 years)
Hampshire, England, United Kingdom
Latitude: N51.057695 Longitude: W1.308063

Death of a brotherAbraham David Harvey Captain
22 September 1903 (Age 61 years)
Burial of a brotherAbraham David Harvey Captain
26 September 1903 (Age 61 years)
Death of a sisterMary Anne Harvey
March 1904 (Age 61 years)
Burial of a sisterMary Anne Harvey
March 1904 (Age 61 years)
Marriage of a childGeorge Henry JohnsonMaria HarveyView this family
5 January 1906 (Age 63 years)
Methodist Church, Inverell, New South Wales, Australia
Latitude: S29.774622 Longitude: E151.117807

Marriage of a childRichard Elliott BamfordElizabeth HarveyView this family
10 November 1906 (Age 64 years)
Roma, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.569448 Longitude: E148.783762

Marriage of a childJoseph Waldron HarveyAlice SmithView this family
7 January 1909 (Age 66 years)
Roma, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.569448 Longitude: E148.783762

Death of a brotherWilliam Harvey Twin
December 1910 (Age 68 years)
Burial of a brotherWilliam Harvey Twin
December 1910 (Age 68 years)
Marriage of a childJohn William HarveyMargaret Elizabeth ‘Dolly’ DohertyView this family
2 January 1915 (Age 72 years)
Roma, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.569448 Longitude: E148.783762

Death of a brotherGeorge Blyth Harvey
16 October 1917 (Age 75 years)
Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Latitude: S36.15 Longitude: E146.6

Burial of a brotherGeorge Blyth Harvey
October 1917 (Age 75 years)
Death 18 January 1928 (Age 85 years)
Wallumbilla, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Latitude: S26.4838 Longitude: E149.24952

Burial 19 January 1928 (1 day after death)
Address: Wallumbilla North Road
Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: 24 September 1820Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
3 months
elder sister
Maria Harvey
Birth: 2 January 1821 24 16Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: 18 February 1821Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
13 months
elder sister
Mary Harvey
Birth: January 1822 25 17Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: 8 January 1824Brook St, Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
2 years
elder brother
Abraham Henry Harvey
Birth: about 1823 26 18Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: 1824Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
3 years
elder sister
3 years
elder brother
Stephen George Halls Harvey
Birth: October 1828 32 23Brook Street, Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: 22 March 1886Anglesea Rd, Elmstead, Essex, England, United Kingdom
18 months
elder brother
Abraham David Harvey Captain
Birth: 3 April 1830 34 25Brook Street, Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: 22 September 1903Anglesea Rd, Elmstead, Essex, England, United Kingdom
3 years
elder sister
Maria Harvey
Birth: 11 October 1832 36 27Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
2 years
elder brother
17 months
elder sister
21 months
elder sister
Elizabeth Harvey Twin
Birth: 4 January 1838 41 33Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: England, United Kingdom
elder brother
William Harvey Twin
Birth: 4 January 1838 41 33Brook St, Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: December 1910Deptford, Greenwich, London, England, United Kingdom
3 years
elder sister
21 months
himself
23 months
younger sister
1 month
younger sister
Alice Harvey
Birth: February 1844 47 39Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: 17 January 1847Wivenhoe, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Family with Emma Waldron - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: 3 May 1869Beechworth, Indigo, Victoria, Australia
13 months
son
John William Harvey
Birth: 28 May 1870 28 20Albury Road, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia
Death: 3 August 1939Roma, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
19 months
daughter
22 months
son
Alfred Waldron Harvey
Birth: 15 November 1873 31 24Eldorado, Woolshed Valley, Victoria, Australia
Death: 12 April 1949Roma Hospital, Roma, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
21 months
daughter
2 years
son
George Henry Harvey
Birth: 9 August 1877 35 27Eldorado, Woolshed Valley, Victoria, Australia
Death: 18 February 1878Eldorado, Woolshed Valley, Victoria, Australia
15 months
daughter
Sarah Harvey
Birth: 11 November 1878 36 29Chiltern, Victoria, Australia
Death: 24 March 1885Myall Lagoons, Wallumbilla, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
22 months
daughter
23 months
daughter
Caroline Dowcett Harvey
Birth: 14 August 1882 40 32Ovens District, Woolshed Valley, Victoria, Australia
Death: 25 October 1963Wynnum, Moreton Bay, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
18 months
son
Joseph Waldron Harvey
Birth: 27 February 1884 41 34Chadford, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Death: 25 October 1963Ipswich, Queensland, Australia
2 years
daughter
3 years
daughter
Harriet Hannah Harvey
Birth: 18 October 1889 47 39Chadford, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Death: 26 February 1961Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia
2 years
son
2 years
son
Richard Harvey
Birth: 1 August 1894 52 44Stephenson Street, Yuleba, Roma District, Queensland, Australia
Death: 28 August 1983Millers Road, Underwood, Logan, Queensland, Australia

Burial

Grave sites dating back to 1896

http://www.maranoa.qld.gov.au/search-cemeteries

Shared note

HARVEY JOHN, age 23, arrived Vic 'JAN 1865' ship LONDON, British, fiche 241 page011

It is possible that Jonathan arrived in 1865, assisted immigrant as above, no other Harvey found onboard Commonwealth Electoral Roll 1903 @ Rose Farm, Wallumbilla, farmer.

Wivenhoe in Queensland. The property was named after a maritime town in Essex, England, on the River Colne, near Colchester. Wivenhoe had been taken up by the Uhr brothers, one of whom was killed by the Aboriginals while working sheep in a yard near the present Lake Manchester. The surviving brother, together with a retired naval man, J. S. Ferriter, held the property for some time. It was bought by the North family in 1849. Wivenhoe Inn nearby became a popular stopping place. The name has been given to the dam built to augment Brisbane's water supply. I have not tried to find the connection between the Uhr family and Wivenhoe but that is where the name Wivenhoe in Queensland came from. That land was divided and became many properties with many different names since then. Perhaps if I find the time I should delve into this matter further. Jonathan Harvey was the twelfth child of George Harvey and Maria (Blyth) Hall. He was born at Brook St. Wivenhoe on the 23rd March 1842. The census of 1841 shows Jonathan's family as a whole unit. When I first searched the 1851 census forWivenhoe I was dismayed to find no trace of the family. It was on the second day of my search at the Mormon Church Reader that I found the remnants of a Harvey family with Maria Harvey (Widow) as Its head. I knew that George Harvey had died but it w as not until I visited the cemetery at Wivenhoe and found his memorial that I knew when and how. The date on the stone was one year out having been erected by his grandson Abraham Harvey many years later.

1861 census, ships at sea has a James born Wivenhoe, Ord. Seaman age 17 on the "Little Jenny" .(Mate of Little Jenny was his uncle, John Blyth) Could this be Jonathan????? No James born Wivenhoe 1843/4???

Jonathan never really knew his father George Harvey. His mother Maria seems to have been a very capable person, assuming the role of both mother and father. The two eldest boys had both left school and one Stephen followed the family trade oharvesting the sea (later to become a "Pilot for the Port of Colchester) and Abraham was an apprentice on a merchant ship and only returned home for a short period every three months.

Maria lived on a pension from the church. Maria's mother, now married to John Blyth lived next door and George's brothers lived at Wivenhoe, but do not appear to have assisted (financially) the fatherless family.

Jonathan had a relatively normal upbringing, he went to the parish church school (The National School) and at the age of 14 he went to sea on the merchant ship (coal carrier) 125 ton "Alfred" Thomas Philbrook. Master, Abraham Harvey (his brother ) as Mate, John (Jonathan)apparently as a Boy (or Lad). John (Jonathan) was discharged on or about the 15 or 25 of April 1856. oral history has Jonathan (appears as John on most documents until his son John was born) indentured to his brother Abraham Harvey (Master) as 'apprentice mariner' on the 'Hannah' . Records show that John (Jonathan) joined the "Hannah" on the 29 September 1856 at Colchester as a Lad and was still on board at Colchester the 31 Dec. 1856 (I have not found a record of his departure from the Hannah but it is thought to be around 1861 or as late as 1865!!!). They had just completed three months at sea carrying coal from Seaham Harbour, Sunderland to London (this ship was owned by his two elder brothers Abraham & Stephen Harvey;- 94 tons, - 65.4 ft. long - `18.8 ft. wide - Hold depth 11.5 ft. deep). Jonathan told his children tales of the wrecks (perhaps referring to the wreck of the 'Hannah') and rescue which took place in the sea at that time . The only parts his children were to remember was the horror of It all, the screams of people in the foaming waves or of ships on the treacherous sands at the mouth of the Thames. Once these sands captured a large vessel in a storm, there was n o way it would ever escape. The Wivenhoe fishermen risked their lives to rescue the survivors of these wrecks and also to put men on board the wrecks to claim salvage. The sea and the sands held the souls of an innumerable number of north-seamen , by making them pay the supreme sacrifice for harvesting its riches. Many a haul of fish have been release because the nets because they held the bones of a fishermen (some still in oilskins). The book, 'TheNorth-seamen' records the lives of the fishermen of the Colne and Blackwater rivers, also mentions Harvey family members. Another book 'Smugglers Century' records the life of the revenue service, and mentions people from the Wivenhoe area including the Harvey family. Both are very informative for people trying to understand the life of the people of those early times

Jonathan Harvey's early youth may have been filled with tales of fabulous wealth that could be obtained with little effort from the Australian gold fields. Perhaps letters from his brother George Blyth Harvey who ran away from home after the unfortunate death of his father and who eventually went to Australia thought to be around the year 1852 sparked the spirit of adventure to the new land. This life in the new country appealed to Jonathan, much more than the stench of fish, the sea & tar, storms, wrecks, death and salvage, including his voyages on many craft (including his brothers boats, 'Hannah' & 'Jessie Annendale') that had been the life of most of his family members. This fabulous dream was to change Jonathan's life forever - still of a young age he following his brother George Blyth Harvey who went to Victoria years earlier, leaving the life of the seamen he made his way to London. It is thought he may have secured a position as crewman on the merchantman "The Royal Bride" (not totally proven as I have, as yet not found another ship except as a possible assisted passenger in 1865) and worked his passage to Australia. Jonathan's thoughts as he left England's shores for a new life on the opposite side of the world has not been recorded. Some emotion must have been felt as he sailed through the waters near the mouth of the Colne, perhaps a tear for the Mother he loved and for his brothers and sisters left behind,- who knows?

Jonathan would have settled down on his new ship, a fine Barque Just two years old, of some 528 tons, with Captain Laker as her Master. It would have been very different from his brother schooners of around 100 tons. The sea would have seemed endless, the winds and waves would batter the ship so much at times that they had to take in sail, other times It was so calm this large ship hardly moved. The crew having nothing to do except think of their families at home - or In Jonathan's case to dwell on the wonders of the new land which lay ahead, of It's vast expanses of land, strange animals, and wondering if the gold fields were as rich as he believed them to be.

Jonathan would have been pleased to see, coming into view through the mist, the rugged cliffs of the southern coast of Australia. He was probably wondering as the ship sailed along the coast, whether he had done the right thing, finally, after taking on board a pilot from Queenstown, the 'Royal Bride; sailed on the incoming tide, through the rip into Port Philip bay. Australia.

It was July 1860, how he travelled to the gold fields is not known, he probably had little money and after receiving his pay of six Pounds, seventeen shillings and six pence upon leaving the ship. Jonathan would have had to use some of this to buy a pick and shovel and a dish to pan for gold as this was his ambition. Perhaps he had a firearm to hunt for food. for it is known he had an ancient rifle which he used on his Wallumbilla and Chadford properties. It is not known if George Blyth Harvey (arrived Victoria 1852) also had gold fever but it is certain the brothers were together in the same areas around Beechworth, Sebastopal, Eldorado and Chiltern (Victoria) in that early period of Jonathan's life in Australia.

I have read Jonathan's obituaries. checked directories and visited all of the areas Jonathan lived and worked while he was in Victoria; and N S. W. His true story differs slightly from the obituaries written in the newspapers and it fits historical fact so I believe this story of Jonathan's life to be a true and accurate statement - I leave you to be the judge.

Jonathan headed for the gold fields, most likely on foot for he had little money. He travelled to Ballarat to try his luck; but by now the alluvial gold was very difficult to find. Then on to Castlemaine and Bendigo with similar results. Continuously on the move Jonathan worked his way into N. S. W. Almost a year after his arrival we find Jonathan at Burrangong. Gold was there but not plentiful and a new wave of Chinese had come to this field much to the annoyance of the miners. There had been riots here prior to Jonathan's arrival at Burrangong. and the climate was set for another eruption to occur. (Jonathan's obituary states that he witnessed the Chinese Riots at Rutherglen, I checked this out in a visit to that town, and found no evidence of riots occurring there). Whether or not Jonathan took part In the riots that followed at Lambing Flats is not certain. Oral history passed down through his family mentions an encounter with a Chinaman.Jonathan told his child ren about the bald patch he had In his beard, and he said part of it had been pulled out by a Chinaman. he caught stealing his gold. In the struggle the Chinaman. 'grabbed a handful of Jonathan's beard and pulled It out skin and all', - the hair never grew again. Jonathan was so furious he grabbed the Chinaman. by the pigtail and dragged him along the full length of the sluice. There is also a story of Jonathan and a gold nugget. This story has two different version and goes as follows:

No.1. Jonathan was dismantling an abandoned Chinese hut and found a nugget of gold hidden In the framework of the rickety structure.

No.2 Jonathan was camped In an old abandoned hut which had been the home of a Chinaman., he was down on his luck almost to the point of starvation, when a nugget of gold fell from the roof. If these stories were changed to fit in with reports of the Lambing Flat riots, he could appear to have been an active participant of these riots. However his character would not suggest this, even so it must be remembered that he was Just 19 years of age at this time. Jonathan's obituary also mentions Jonathan being visited by two bushrangers who stayed for several hours and departed peacefully. Jonathan recognised one as Frank Gardiner This fits in exactly with the same area about the same time. Frank Gardiner's last exploit was a daring raid on the gold escort at Eugowra Rock, on 5th June 1862. The visit would have to be prior to that date. Frank Gardlner's hold-up of the gold escort was to be the largest haul ever obtained by a bushranger in New South Wales. That fact alone would have resulted In Jonathan telling the story quite often to his young wide-eyed family.

Jonathan moved back into the Woolshed Valley in Victoria. It is at this point that Jonathan and George Blyth Harvey are together but we do not know if this was their first meeting. In 1868 John had acquired some fortune and was mining at Sebastopal, in the Woolshed Valley near Beechworth, here he met Emma Waldron, who was to become his wife. Jonathan Harvey married Emma Waldron in the tiny Congregational church at Beechworth on the 3rd May 1869, the same year as the foundation-stone o f the historic Congregational Church (now operating as the Library) was laid, I might add that this little church is also totally protected as an historic building and still stands behind the much larger church at Beechworth.

Jonathan and Emma moved to Wagga Wagga N. S. W, where Jonathan operated a dairy on the Albury Road, it was here that their first child, John was born in May 1870. On their return to Victoria in 1871, Jonathan purchased or leased the Reidford hotel at Sebastopal, which he operated as publican. Two more children Maria (8th Jan. 1872 - Sebastopal) and Alfred, (15th Nov. 1873 Eldorado) were born here in the Woolshed Valley. At this time the Hotel was sold, Jonathan, Emma and their three children went to the Gold fields on the Lachian River around Forbes. Jonathan worked on the Warrigal Sheep Station near Forbes while Emma gave birth to their fourth child Elizabeth. (1875) When Emma was fit to travel, the family went back at the gold fields. 1876 finds them at McGuiggans Lead) an alluvial field 9 miles from Parks - like Sebastopal and many other gold towns nothing remains of McGuiggans Lead today.

Jonathan returned to Victoria in 1877 and mined at Eldorado, here their son George Henry was born on the 9th August, 1877, just six months later he died and is buried at Eldorado, Victoria. Jonathan and Emma went to Chiltern where they were to have their sixth child, Sarah -born on the 11th November 1879. Also born at Chiltern was Jane Helen - 5th September 1880 and Caroline - 14th August, 1882. Jonathan made one last gold mining venture into the New South Wales. diggings at Temora, this time leaving his family in Victoria.

The glowing reports of the Western Downs of Queensland as described by Emma's father and brothers persuaded Jonathan and Emma to dispose of their interests in Victoria. They travelled across the Murray one the last time, setting off for Queensland and a new future.

Christmas 1882 at Roma, Queensland, was a happy time for Jonathan & Emma, especially for Emma, as she was reunited with her family. Her father Alfred and all but two of her brothers and sisters (two sisters had married and remained In Victoria) had travelled overland from Victoria to Queensland in canvas covered wagons. Emma's stepmother, Mary Waldron, gave birth to a son at Cantas Gully New South Wales during the trip north. Jonathan, Emma and their seven children aged from 3months to 11 years did the same Journey in a much easier way Travelling firstly from Victoria to Sydney by train, then coastal steamer to Brisbane and again by train from Brisbane to Roma on the line that had recently opened the Western Downs of Queensland to settlers.

Jonathan took up land at Mac's Gully, Euthella, and purchased a flock of sheep. This land was unsuited to Jonathan's needs so he leased the 20000 acre property 'Franksvale Creek'. The family loaded all their possessions in a wagon and drove their sheep in easy stages to this property 126 kilometres S. W of Roma. When 'Franksvale Creek' was later sold to a Mr Flower, Jonathan purchased 'Myall Lagoons' at Chadford, a property of 2200 acres originally selected by Emma's brother Alfred Waldron. The sheep were shepherded by the children while Jonathan and the two eldest boys built fences to hold the sheep safe from the native dogs at night. Note: The Warrigal (Dingo) was in a sense farmed by the Aborigine. The dog followed the aborigine from camp to camp, their numbers being constantly culled. When their masters the Aborigines were moved to the government camp on Bungle creek nearRoma, the. dogs ran wild and in their hunt for food, found the flocks of sheep easy prey.

Life went on in a routine fashion at 'Myall Lagoons' until 1885. In February that year Sarah Harvey took ill with what was then described as a 'low fever'. As there was no doctor available, Sarah was treated at home. On the 24th March, 1885 -some six weeks after the first signs of illness, Sarah died aged six years, four and a half months. Sarah Harvey is buried Just off the road in a lonely little grave on the bank of Kangaroo Creek at Chadford Perhaps it was the death of his daughter that prompted Jonathan to take the next step. for it was about this time that he loaded a pack horse with supplies and headed north to prospect for gold. After spending some time in the area around Camboon (now a gold mine) he returned home finally free from the lure of gold that he had followed with some success during his earlier years in Victoria and New South Wales.

The eldest children of Jonathan and Emma were now young adults. in recognising the fact that their needs in life were more than sheep and kangaroos it was decided that the family would move to a more populated area. in 1891 'Myall Lagoons' was old. Their next home was at Yuleba then a thriving centre with a permanent population of 450, and a large number of people constantly moving through the town. The railroad here was the hub of the whole area east of Roma. 'Cobb & Co' Coaches' radiated their services from there as well as operating several businesses in the town. ('Cobb & Co Coaches' were to run their last coach service in Australia from Yuleba some thirty years later). Constant movement of livestock and produce to and from Yuleba, also helped to make the business centre prosperous. Here Jonathan and Emma operated the Commercial Hotel (one of three in the town) and a general store.

Two sons were born to Jonathan and Emma at the Commercial Hotel, and a house was purchased in Perry St. to accommodate their large family of 11 children. It was at Yuleba that some of the children had the opportunity to attend a normal school.( it was noted that Jonathan had a contract in 1894 to supply telephone poles in the area.)

Sometime in 1896 their business interests in Yuleba were sold, the house let, and the family moved to Wallumbilla. Land was selected by Jonathan & Emma about 3 kilometres out of town, on which a three roomed house with a detached kitchen was built. They named this property 'Rose Farm' it is noted they were to use this name as their postal address for the rest of their lives, irrespective of on which property they lived Land was cleared for crops, sheep and horses were grazed on the remainder. Jonathan was also operating a butcher shop at Wallumbilla in 1896 & 1897+, little is known of this enterprise, which lasted two or three years although he appears to still own slaughter yards there. Four of Jonathan and Emma's daughters had found work on stations in the surrounding districts or lived at Roma. The three eldest sons had their own selections, leaving the four youngest children at home with their parents.

William James Cope (the son of Jonathan's younger sister Ellen ) a constable of Police in England and a veteran of the Boar War, migrated to Queensland because of his health. William (Bill) was suffering from T. B. and his doctor had recommended a drier climate. On arrival he went to Wallumbilla to stay with his uncle. Jonathan, Emma and some of their sons had taken up land at Chadford. Bill Cope, still seriously ill, decided he would apply for a selection as well. The approval to select was dated 23 February 1909, some seven months after William James Cope's death on the 1 June, 1908 Jonathan was appointed administrator and took over the selection on which Bill Cope had paid the survey fees. Jonathan built a house and fenced the property, built yards and cleared land for crops. Having met all the conditions of the selection, he applied for permission to purchase, this was granted and the deed was made to Jonathan Harvey Administrator. Jonathan later tried to s ell this property and found to his dismay the proceeds of the sale would have to go to the Cope family in England. It was agreed however that Jonathan and Emma would have the use of the land for their lifetime. When this property was sold in 19 44, the proceeds of the sale was sent to the Cope family in England.

By 1914 Jonathan now 72, and Emma, a young 64 were very large land owners. When war was declared, their son Edward enlisted, as did their grandson Thomas Harvey (who had helped run their Chadford properties but left after a disagreement with Jonathan). This left their youngest son Richard to run all their properties at Chadford, while Joseph, an older son, ran their Wallumbilla properties along with his own. In 1915 when Richard (now 21) enlisted, all the sheep were sold and the best of the dairy herd were moved to the Pickanjinnie property, which was close to the railway station. The Wallumbilla gas field is directly under this property and the bore-head is on the exact spot that their home once stood.) Jonathan and Emma ran this property as a dairy until 1918, sending their cream to the butter factory by rail. Next to the Pickanjinnie property Jonathan also had a lease of some 300 acres. This property was to pass into the hands of the Lingard family, Just how or when is not known at this point in time. Richard (Dick) Harvey said that Jonathan owned land behind these Pickinjinnie properties, way back 'as far as the eye could see. It was thought then that Jonathan owned all the land in between, this was not so. An advertisement appeared in the 'Western Star' for an auction of the many properties then owned by Jonathan at Wallumbilla and Pickinjinnie. In the list of land to be auctioned was an isolated block that fitted the general description as told by Dick Harvey. Joseph Harvey, the son who ran the Wallumbilla properties in conjunction with his own, decided to move to Roma with his wife Alice and young family to run a carrying business - he no longer wished to have anything to do with the land (mainly because of the devastating prickly pear) and gave his property to his mother Emma. Jonathan and Emma eventually decided they were now too old to continue on the land and put all their properties at Wallumbilla and Pickanjinnie up for auction. Unfortunately all the properties were passed in, owing to the depressed state of the market. This situation was created by the large number of war casualties in the district. Their properties had to be sold to recover debts owing, a sad state of affairs for young men who gave their all for King and Country. During 1918, Jonathan was helping to raise funds for the 'Welcome Home of their Heroes' and it was in that year they welcomed home their youngest son. Richard had been sent home to recuperate from wounds he received in the 'Battle of the Somme' A report in the 'Western Star states -On Monday night last, a welcome was accorded to Private R.Harvey by the residents of Chadford and district. The function took place In Chadford school, which was nicely decorated with flags etc. As the returned soldier was entering the room with his father and mother, Miss Florrie Yates in a sweet voice sang,'Coming Home' Their son Edward Harvey did not arrive home until 1919, his welcome home was a double celebration combined with the Golden Anniversary of Jonathan and Emma. This celebration was postponed until all the family could all be together again. Thomas Groom (Tom) Harvey was the last to return from overseas, and did not arrive in Brisbane until 11th June, 1919, and discharged on the 25th April, 1920 - just under 5 years of service. Tom did not return to Wallumbilla, but went back to the Railway, a position he held just prior to Joining the A. I . F. and stayed there until he retired.

Jonathan and Emma retired in 1919 after their sons had returned home. Their old home at Yuleba was moved to Wallumbilla, where Jonathan lived until his death in 1928.

Jonathan's death certificate signed by Dr. Power states that he died from Myocarditis and Cardiac failure, but in his book 'Bush Doctor' Dr Power writes -Old Grandfather Harvey did not have the advantage of Mick's youth and despite Matron's care his life slowly ebbed away.... "So all you have to do Doctor, is make out the Death Certificate' said Matron, 'and that's that'. That was far from being that. Grandfather had only just made it to hospital, dying an hour after his admission. Iha d never attended him, (The Death Certificate states that Dr. Power had visited Jonathan the day earlier)... and according to the 55 relatives (apparently including myself) who gathered from far and wide, nor had any medico for the best part of a quarter of a century, so, legally I couldn't sign a death certificate. Nor did I feel inclined to do a postmortem with the temperature at 105 degrees in the shade, and four generations of Grandpa's relatives hovering on the verandah. I puta cal l through to the coroner in nearby Roma. As the old bloke was 94 (Jonathan would have been 86 in March) years old, and there were no suspicious circumstances, the coroner authorised me to endorse the certificate 'By permission of the Coroner'. ( so much for a true story?????)

Emma lived on in their old home for another 12 years, before she went to live in Brisbane with her son Richard at Kuraby, it was not long after that she was hospitalised in Janolma, a private hospital at Greenslopes. The little English born Australian Pioneer, who was almost buried at sea as a child, died on the 9th September, 1940 Just short of her 91st birthday.

Little remains of the house on Rose Farm (Wallumbilla) except a couple of posts and a rusty old stove. No trace of Jonathan's houses remain on the other properties. The house which was moved to Wallumbilla from Yuleba is still being used as a residence. The town itself is no larger than it was in Jonathan's time ((has grown a lot since I first wrote this). Yuleba is but a shadow of its original glory. No hotels remain in the old town today. A new hotel/motel was built on the main road to cater for through traffic. Chadford as a centre does not exist - the hall that was built after WW. I was moved to Wallumbilla. The school tennis court is still being used (to this day) but the school that was built in 1915 has long gone. Burial Place Wallumbilla Cemetery.

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Media objectJonathan*John) Harvey
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Media objectJonathan Harvey Golden wedding present by sons
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